PHARMACY

Rite Aid launches smartphone app

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — Rite Aid has become the latest chain to join the retail smartphone application game.

The Camp Hill, Pa.-based retail pharmacy chain recently launched an app for smartphones that allows users to refill prescriptions by scanning their barcodes or entering the prescription number, transfer prescriptions, manage their Wellness+ loyalty card accounts, view weekly circulars and compile shopping lists, among other features.

The app is available for major smartphone brands including the Apple iPhone and Android phones.


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N.METHUSIAK says:
Mar-26-2012 07:03 pm

Great for Rite Aid. We all need better drugs.

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PHARMACY

Report: Metformin cost-effective strategy in battling diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Lifestyle intervention and treatment with metformin provide safe, long-term, cost-effective means of preventing Type 2 diabetes and should be incorporated into prevention strategies for reducing the dramatic rise in incidence of Type 2 diabetes in the United States, according to two new analyses and an editorial published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

The two reports provide further analyses and follow-up to the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program research first funded a decade ago primarily by the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The studies are accompanied by an editorial highlighting the American Diabetes Association’s recently revised Strategic Plan, which calls for an increased focus on translating the growing body of research on prevention into primary care and community treatment strategies.

One analysis by the Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group found that over 10 years, investing in lifestyle intervention or treatment with metformin for adults at high risk for Type 2 diabetes provided “good value for the money.” Over the first three years of the clinical trial, lifestyle interventions — losing 5% to 8% of body weight, or 10 to 16 lbs. for a 200-lb. person, plus increasing physical activity to at least 150 minutes per week — reduced the incidence of Type 2 diabetes by 58% and significantly improved quality of life. Metformin reduced diabetes by 31%. This follow-up analysis found that lifestyle intervention came at a cost-effectiveness of about $10,000 per cumulative-quality-adjusted life-year gained. Cost-effectiveness of such commonly used interventions as mammography or blood pressure generally range from $10,000 to $50,000 per QALY.

"This new analysis of costs and outcomes in the DPP and its follow-up study show both metformin and lifestyle change were very cost-effective for prevention or delay of Type 2 diabetes when analyzed from the perspective of healthcare payers," stated Griffin Rodgers, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Metformin treatment led to a small savings in healthcare costs over 10 years. The individual training in lifestyle change, as delivered in the study, was cost-effective and could become cost saving if offered to groups in community settings."

The second analysis found that long-term treatment with metformin safely produced sustained weight loss at 10 years and prevented or delayed the onset of Type 2 diabetes.

Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 35% of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older may have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough for a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis.

 

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Court dismisses AstraZeneca case against FDA

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — A federal court has dismissed a case that drug maker AstraZeneca filed against regulators regarding a drug used to treat psychotic and bipolar disorders, the company said Monday.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia dismissed AstraZeneca’s lawsuit against the Food and Drug Administration over generic formulations of Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate) and its extended-release version, Seroquel XR. The roots of the lawsuit go back to September 2011, when the drug maker asked the agency to withhold approval of any generic version of the drug whose labeling didn’t include warning language about risks of elevated blood sugar and suicide that it had required AstraZeneca to include.

The FDA turned down AstraZeneca’s request on March 7, prompting the company to sue the agency five days later. The company had requested an injunction against the FDA’s approval of any generic version of Seroquel until the Dec. 2, 2012 expiration of clinical trial data.

"Notwithstanding the court’s decision, the company continues to believe strongly in the merits of its position and is evaluating its options," a statement by AstraZeneca read.


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