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Rite Aid appoints new EVP merchandising

BY Alaric DeArment

CAMP HILL, Pa. — Rite Aid’s SVP category management Tony Montini has been promoted to EVP merchandising, the pharmacy retailer said Monday.

In addition, SVP business development Bryan Shirtliff has been promoted to the new position of SVP merchandising.

As EVP merchandising, Montini, who began working for Rite Aid as SVP category management in February 2010 — though he previously served as VP purchasing from 1987 to 1989 and as SVP category management from 2002 to 2003 — will oversee field merchandising and new store format development in addition to his current category management responsibilities. Montini’s new responsibilities include the Wellness stores, Value + stores and co-branded Save-A-Lot Rite Aid stores.

Shirtliff will report to Montini and will continue to be responsible for store segmentation initiatives and front-end merchandising.

“Tony has done a terrific job this past year in strengthening our category management department and further building upon our strong relationship with suppliers,” Martindale said. “With his broad-based retail experience and expertise in chain drug merchandising and marketing, he will be a great asset in strengthening our field merchandising capabilities and continuing the development of the new store formats that are part of our segmentation strategy.”

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[email protected] says:
Apr-20-2011 09:45 pm

Thanks for your feedback William. We will pass on your suggestion. In spirit, we agree with your comments--we believe America needs more retail clinics in general, and I am certain the community in which you live and work is no exception. Access and affordability are the key issues with regards to health care in America. But opening clinics is not as easy as it should be, particularly, given the pronounced need we have for them. Laws governing things like physician oversight and scope of practice vary from one state to the next. That said, Rite Aid does in fact operate clinics in the state of California, including 7 Lindora Clinics in southern California and three Sutter Express Clinics in the Sacramento area. That's not to say that they don't need a clinic in Needles, Calif.; you're probably right about that. But you should know that the company you work for thinks retail clinics are important and deliver real value back to the community! Again, thanks for your feedback. BEST WISHES, ROB EDER EDITOR IN CHIEF THE DRUG STORE NEWS GROUP

W.GARNER says:
Apr-18-2011 09:01 pm

Dear DSN; I am a Rite Aid pharmacist in the small desert town of Needles, California. Needles is a poor town with a lot of our bussiness being, Medi-Cal - state medicaid. Our store has small prescription volume, but has had a much greater volume in the past. This is the rub - there are no Medi-Cal providers in the city! Most people have to go the Emergency room or those with Medicare D plans - 20 miles across the Colorado river to Arizona. There are only two drug stores in our town - ours (Rite Aid) and a independent; so competetion is low. Does Rite Aid have any stores with medical clinics in them - like CVS does? I know if there was a clinic in our store, or even in our bussiness complex - our volume would soar. It is kind of like that oil play in South Dakota where they have to drill vertically and fracture the shale rock to reach the oil. Really, it would open up a new world for our store if the people had access to a Medi-Cal provider - plus not to mention the traffic from travelers on Interstate 40. Could you, DSN, relay this message to Mr. Montini? Even if he has no helpfull suggestions; he may know the people to write to. Sincerely, William M. Garner Pharmacist, Rite Aid 5699

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Publix to donate funds to SFP

BY Michael Johnsen

LAKELAND, Fla. — In recognition of Earth Day, Publix Super Markets on Monday pledged to donate 50 cents per pound, up to $40,000, to Sustainable Fisheries Partnership when customers purchase any wild domestic shrimp from April 17 to 27.

“As a retailer passionately committed to eco-savvy practices, our support of SFP speaks directly to our sustainable philosophy of meeting today’s demands without compromising what’s essential for tomorrow,” stated Maria Brous, Publix media and community relations director. “We are uniquely positioned to share information with our customers to enrich the quality of life for our communities and aquatic ecosystems, all while doing our part to preserve and conserve."

The mission of SFP is to maintain a healthy ocean and aquatic ecosystem by rebuilding depleted fish stocks and reducing the environmental impacts of fishing and farm fishing. The Publix donation would assist SFP in providing fisheries along the Gulf with the resources and tools needed to operate in a more sustainable manner.

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Deloitte: Consumers turn to various resources for recall information

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — Consumers that seek timely and detailed information about product recalls look to multiple resources, according to a new Deloitte survey.

Although most consumers (73% and 69%, respectively) hold manufacturers and government agencies responsible for conveying recall information in a timely fashion, Internet access and social media are driving consumers to advocacy groups (up 12% this year to 35%) and peers (27%, up 8% from 2010) for up-to-date recall information. For instance, more than 9-out-of-10 consumers feel the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s new online database will be important in helping them make future purchasing decisions.

When it comes to which products raised the biggest safety concerns, most consumers cited household products, including cleaners and detergents (56%), and such personal care products as cosmetics and moisturizers (57%). When it comes to food products, the healthiness of ingredients is the No. 1 concern for more than half of consumers surveyed (up 5 percentage points from 2010 to 54%).

Deloitte, however, also noted that about 7-out-of-10 consumers are not familiar with the new Food Safety Modernization Act, which is one of the biggest overhauls to the nation’s food safety system.

"Consumers want checks and balances in the information they receive and are insisting on a greater level of transparency about the safety, ingredients and origin of products. So they’re turning to advocacy groups and peers as trusted sources," Deloitte vice chairman and U.S. consumer products practice leader Pat Conroy said. "This is a wake-up call for consumer products companies; they need to get ahead of this shift and work more directly with consumers to build brand advocates and stronger customer relationships."

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