HEALTH

Research finds risk of developing Type 2 diabetes lower in breast-feeding mothers

BY Antoinette Alexander

PITTSBURGH Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that mothers who did not breast-feed their children have higher rates of Type 2 diabetes later in life compared with those who breast-fed.

 

"We have seen dramatic increases in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes over the last century," stated Eleanor Schwarz, assistant professor of medicine, epidemiology, and obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. "Diet and exercise are widely known to impact the risk of Type 2 diabetes, but few people realize that breast-feeding also reduces mothers’ risk of developing the disease later in life by decreasing maternal belly fat."

 

The study, published in the September issue of the American Journal of Medicine, included 2,233 women between the ages of 40 and 78 years.

Overall, 56% of mothers reported they had breast-fed an infant for at least one month. Twenty-seven percent of mothers who did not breast-feed developed Type 2 diabetes and were almost twice as likely to develop the disease as women who had breast-fed or never given birth. In contrast, mothers who breast-fed all of their children were no more likely to develop diabetes than women who never gave birth. These long-term differences were notable even after considering age, race, physical activity, and tobacco and alcohol use.

"Our study provides another good reason to encourage women to breast-feed their infants, at least for the infant’s first month of life," Schwarz added. "Clinicians need to consider women’s pregnancy and lactation history when advising women about their risk for developing Type 2 diabetes."

The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and the National Institute of Child Health and Development.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

GlaxoSmithKline brand to be featured on Target Indy car

BY Michael Johnsen

INDIANAPOLIS Chip Ganassi Racing on Wednesday announced that GlaxoSmithKline’s Breathe Right brand will be placed on the nose of the team’s Target Indy car this weekend during the Peak Antifreeze and Motor Oil Indy 300 Chicagoland Speedway races.

Additionally, on Aug. 28, race fans will have the opportunity to meet two-time and reigning IZOD IndyCar Series champion Dario Franchitti, driver of the Target Indy car, on-site at the Breathe Right Advanced tent where free product samples will be made available.

“Putting on my nasal strip is part of my ritual when suiting up for every race as I need it to breathe better so I am ready to operate at 100%,” Franchitti stated. “However, you don’t need to be a professional driver to understand the importance of being at your best. Breathe Right nasal strips can help you breathe better so you can get a good night’s sleep.”

GlaxoSmithKline will tout its latest Breathe Right product introduction, Breathe Right Advanced, at the race. The newly patented strip has a unique design allowing for four points of contact to increase airflow and help open nasal passages more completely. 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

Black & Decker introduces digital gardening device

BY Alaric DeArment

TOWSON, Md. Tool company Black & Decker has introduced a device that it says is designed to take the guesswork out of gardening.

PlantSmart uses a digital sensor to measure information — such as sunlight, temperature, moisture and soil conditions — about the garden. Users then can upload data to an online account to find information about plants’ needs based on local conditions.

The company plans initially to roll out the device in September on Amazon.com and Target.com, and sell it at retailers nationwide in spring 2011.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES