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Reports: Flowers Foods to buy Wonder Bread

BY Jason Owen

NEW YORK — According to published reports, Flowers Foods is set to buy Hostess bread brands, including Wonder bread, for $360 million after no other bidder came forward with a competing offer, a source familiar with the sale acknowledged Wednesday.

According to a Reuters report, Hostess, which went bankrupt last year, was scheduled to host an auction on Thursday for the brands — which also include Butternut, Home Pride, Merita and Nature’s Pride — but as no other bids were announced, the company will not go through with an auction.

There will be an auction for the Beefsteak brand, for which Flowers bid $30 million, since Hostess received a higher bid from Mexico’s Grupo Bimbo, said the source, who declined to be named as the process is private.

Hostess expects to run two more auctions next month. One would be for the Hostess snack cake brands, including Hostess Twinkies and Dolly Madison, for which private equity firms Apollo Global Management and C. Dean Metropoulos set the bidding at $410 million.

The other would be for its Drake’s cake business and additional bread brands. So far, McKee Foods, maker of Little Debbie snack cakes, offered $27.5 million for Drake’s, which includes Ring Dings, Yodels and Devil Dogs.

Though no other bids were made, the deal with Flowers is still subject to approval by a bankruptcy court.


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RightSize Health and Nutrition introduces new smoothies

BY Jason Owen

CHICAGO — As part of its 10th anniversary celebration, RightSize Health and Nutrition has introduced three new smoothie formulas, new packaging and a new website loaded with smoothie recipes and weight-loss tips and advice.

The new RightSize smoothies formula contains more protein and fiber to help curb hunger, as well as natural ingredients, such as green tea and ginger root extracts. Each serving of RightSize contains 15 g of protein and 6 g of fiber when prepared with skim milk, as well as more than 20 essential vitamins and minerals. The smoothies are gluten-free and contain no added caffeine.

“When we were developing the new formula, our goal was to create a great-tasting smoothie that really helps fight cravings while providing the nutrition of a meal,” explained Andrew Dun, VP marketing for RightSize. “So many weight loss products taste like ‘diet food,’ but RightSize smoothies taste like rich, creamy shakes so people actually enjoy them and look forward to their next one.”

RightSize is available in three flavors: Lean Cocoa Bean (chocolate), SkinniVanilli (vanilla) and Slend-A-Berry (strawberry, blueberry and raspberry). The product is packaged in 20.5-oz. canisters (each canister contains 20 servings, or about a 10-day supply) with a suggested retail price of $29.99. The contemporary package design pairs bright colors and a new logo to make it easier to find RightSize on retail shelves.

As the company noted, RightSize smoothies also are backed by recent research that shows they really work. A recent clinical trial published in the November 2012 issue of Current Nutrition and Food Science found that participants who replaced two meals a day with RightSize smoothies and consistently followed their assigned reduced calorie diets lost an average of 15 lbs to 18 lbs in 12 weeks. More information on the clinical study can be found on the new RightSize website, Myrightsize.com, which also supports dieters’ personal weight loss goals by providing diet plans, interactive weight loss tools, and more than 100 smoothie recipes.


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Reports: Legislation would allow Tenn. supermarkets to sell wine

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — A state Senate committee in Tennessee is looking into the possibility of allowing supermarkets to sell wine, according to published reports.

The Memphis, Tenn., Commercial Appeal reported that the proposed law would be subject to approval in local referendums.

Supporters of the bill cited convenience, while opponents — including liquor store owners — said it would be detrimental to public health, safety and the economy, criticizing the legislation as driven by "big national chains" and harmful to locally owned businesses.

 

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