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Report: Real estate agent tells analysts a Walgreens flagship slated for U of Michigan

BY Michael Johnsen

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Walgreens recently negotiated a 20-year lease agreement here for Walgreens’ first university flagship location, said Joey Agree, Agree Realty president and CEO, in a conference call with analysts on Tuesday. The site will serve the University of Michigan, home to the Michigan Wolverines.

Walgreens has not yet confirmed the new site will be a prototypical flagship location, however. 

According to a report published Thursday on AnnArbor.com, Walgreens will be refitting its flagship format into an 18,000 square-foot space across three floors that last housed the Michigan Book & Supply store. 

Michigan Book & Supply closed a year ago as more and more students source their textbooks from online venues, making the location on South State and North University ideal for an omnichannel retailer like Walgreens. 

Construction of the new site is expected to be completed in the first half of 2014, Agree said. 

 

 

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Higher rate of pelvic pain found among women taking low-dose estrogen oral contraceptives

BY Alaric DeArment

SAN DIEGO — Women who take low-dose oral contraceptives may be at increased risk of chronic pelvic-pain symptoms and pain during sexual climax, according to a new study.

The study, scheduled for presentation to reporters at the American Urological Association’s annual scientific meeting in San Diego on Tuesday, was conducted by researchers at New York University and the Waitemata District Health Board in Auckland, New Zealand, compared CPPS in young women who used oral contraceptives with the condition in those who didn’t.

"This study reveals valuable insights into the relationship between oral contraceptives, pelvic pain and how effects may differ depending on hormone dosage," Drexel University College of MEdicine urology and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery chairwoman and urology and OBGYN professor Kristene Whitmore said.

The researchers used data from an anonymous, online survey of women aged 18 to 39 within large university populations but excluded those who were pregnant or who had a history of endometriosis or pelvic pain, dividing 932 respondents into those who took oral contraceptives, those who took low-dose estrogen and those who took a normal dose, defined as more than 20 micrograms.

Of the 327 respondents who used oral contraceptives, 27.1% of those who took estrogen in low doses reported pelvic pain, compared with 17.5% of non-users. Meanwhile, users of low-dose estrogen reported almost twice the incidence of pain or discomfort during or after orgasm compared to non-users, and there was no difference found between non-users and users of normal-dose estrogen. Forty percent of respondents reported onset of pain after starting on oral contraceptives and were more likely to have chronic pelvic pain symptoms than those who had symptoms prior to oral contraceptive use.

 

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Study finds testicular cancer rates on the rise among males aged 15-34

BY Alaric DeArment

SAN DIEGO — Rates of testicular cancer among young men have risen significantly over the last two decades across racial and ethnic groups, according to a new study, and researchers are wondering what accounts for it.

The study, scheduled for presentation Sunday at the 108th annual scientific meeting of the American Urological Association in San Diego, found that testicular cancer – the most common cancer among males between 15 and 34 – still had the highest incidence among Caucasians, but had risen 5.6% among Hispanics between 2002 and 2009, meaning Hispanics had the second highest rates, while African-Americans had the lowest.

Between 1992 and 2009, the rate among Caucasians rose from 7.5-per-100,000 people to 8.6-per-100,000, while the rate among Hispanics rose from 4-per-100,000 to 6.3-per-100,000, and the rate among African-Americans rose from 0.7-per-100,000 to 1.7-per-100,000.

"More research is needed to shed light on why the incidence is up nationwide and if any environmental factors or co-morbidities impact disease formation," University of Kansas Medical Center urology professor and director of urologic oncology Jeff Holzbeierlein said. "These new data confirm Hispanic-Americans should speak with their doctor about risk factors and be even more vigilant with their testicular health."

 

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