News

Red meat consumption linked to Type 2 diabetes risk

BY Allison Cerra

BOSTON — The consumption of processed red meat may pose an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health.

The “Red Meat Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: 3 Cohorts of U.S. Adults and an Updated Meta-Analysis” study — led by An Pan, research fellow in the HSPH department of nutrition, along with senior author and professor of nutrition and epidemiology at HSPH Frank Hu and colleagues — found that a a daily 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat (about the size of a deck of cards) was associated with a 19% increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, while a 50-g serving of processed red meat (i.e., two slices of bacon, one hot dog or one sausage) was associated with a 51% increased risk. Similarly, patients that substituted red meat with a serving of such healthier proteins as low-fat dairy, nuts or whole grains were associated a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes (17%, 21% and 23%, respectively).

The authors pooled their data from three cohorts and analyzed questionnaire responses from a combined total of 204,157 patients. Additionally, HSPH researchers also conducted an updated meta-analysis, combining data from their new study with data from existing studies that included a total of 442,101 patients, 28,228 of whom developed Type 2 diabetes during the study.

The data was adjusted for age, body mass index and other lifestyle and dietary risk factors, the researchers noted.

“Clearly, the results from this study have huge public health implications given the rising Type 2 diabetes epidemic and increasing consumption of red meats worldwide,” Hu said. “The good news is that such troubling risk factors can be offset by swapping red meat for a healthier protein.”

The study was published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

Study: Medicare Part D diabetes patients show better adherence with mail order

BY Alaric DeArment

IRVINE, Calif. — Medicare Part D beneficiaries showed better adherence to their oral diabetes drugs when receiving them by mail order, according to a new study.

The study, conducted on behalf of Prescription Solutions by OptumRx, the pharmacy benefit management arm of health services company Optum, and published in the Journal of Medical Economics, found that patients using mail-order pharmacy showed adherence rates of 49.7%, compared with 42.8% of those who went to retail pharmacies.

"This is the first study to show that mail service can help Medicare Part D members achieve better adherence with their diabetes medications," OptumRx CEO Jacqueline Kosecoff said. "Improving adherence has been shown to prevent the worsening of disease outcomes, decrease the use of health resources and control escalating healthcare costs."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

FDA sets review date for Bydureon

BY Allison Cerra

SAN DIEGO — The Food and Drug Administration has acknowledged the resubmission of an investigational Type 2 diabetes drug made by Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Eli Lilly and Alkermes.

The FDA has set a Jan. 28, 2012 deadline for its review of Bydureon (exenatide extended-release for injectable suspension). The drug, which first was submitted to the FDA in May 2009, was declined by the regulatory agency on two occasions; the drug makers received complete response letters in March 2010 and October 2010. Bydureon, however, received marketing authorization in the European Union in June.

"If approved, we believe Bydureon will be an important new option for type 2 diabetes patients, as the first once-weekly treatment available in the U.S.," Amylin SVP research and development Christian Weyer said. "We will continue to work with the FDA through this stage of the review process."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES