CENTER STORE

Red Diamond releases single-serve coffee and tea

BY Jason Owen

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Red Diamond on Monday announced it will be offering coffee and tea in single-serve format for home or on the go leveraging LBP Manufacturing’s UpShot Solution.

LBP Manufacturing, Inc. recently launched the UpShot Solution to offer roasters and brands like Red Diamond to enter into the single-serve beverage market. The UpShot Filter offers a single-serve experience that is convenient, high-quality and sustainable, according to the company. The filter features a proprietary mesh that allows customers to see and smell the coffee or tea from the moment they open the fresh seal outer packaging. In addition, the sidewall mesh offers multiple points of contact for water and grind creating a better brew, the company stated.

The UpShot Filter is compatible with Keurig coffee makers and other single-serve brewers and is made from 100% polypropylene, making it recyclable along with other #5 plastics. Beginning in June 2013, Red Diamond will offer an initial selection of tea and coffee blends in a single-serve format for customers to enjoy at home or on-the-go.

"While our company has a long history of innovation, LBP’s UpShot single-serve technology is a game changer for us," said Dave Burke , executive vice president of retail distribution, Red Diamond . "We were looking for a single-serve model that fits our needs of quality and efficiency but also allows for flexibility and customization, and the UpShot Solution offers that and much more – it lays the groundwork for new opportunities and is a solution that can really grow with us as a company."

After the initial launch, Red Diamond plans to expand the number of single-serve offerings later this year and into 2014 through iced options, 3-in-1 special blends and celebrity-branded endorsements.

Red Diamond’s single-serve filters will be available for purchase at leading retailers wherever Red Diamond is sold.


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Reports: Dietitians become a bigger feature in supermarkets

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — DSN has reported for many years on the emergence of dietitians in supermarket pharmacies, and an article that appeared in Advertising Age Sunday confirms how big the trend has become.

The advertising industry publication reported that while traditionally found more often at hospitals, dietitians are appearing at supermarket chains like Hy-Vee, Wegmans and Giant Eagle.

The article cited a survey by the Food Marketing Institute showing that while 86% of food retailers employ dietitians in their corporate offices, one-third of stores now have a registered dietitian as well. The job of the dietitian is to help customers find food to improve and protect their health, providing information on weight loss, allergic reactions and other issues.

 

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Study finds skepticism about organic among consumers

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — A majority of surveyed adults in the United States regards organic as an excuse to charge more for food, according to a new study.

The March Harris Poll of 2,276 adults found that those expressing concern for the environment grew from 31% last year to 38% this year, but 59% of respondents saw labeling foods and other products as organic was an excuse to charge more.

"What surprised us most was that while Americans are showing more concern for the environment, they aren’t necessarily willing to pay more to do anything about it," Harris Poll president Mike de Vere said. "While Americans feel better about the economy, many are wary of the ‘greenwashing’ concept that gives companies a chance to cash in on consumers who want to help the planet but are confused by all the eco-friendly jargon."

More than half of respondents reported thinking organic food was healthier than nonorganic despite research indicating that it isn’t, while 41% said it tasted better, but only 23% were aware of the Environmental Working Group’s annual list of foods consumers should buy organic due to pesticide levels, known as the "dirty dozen." Also, despite a study in Germany indicating that using the dishwasher used half the energy, one-sixth the water and less soap than handwashing, many consumers still regarded washing by hand as better for the environment.

Respondents were more evenly divided on whether they thought it was easy to live in an environmentally friendly way, with 49% saying it was difficult and 47% saying it was easy, but 63% said they had made an effort to be environmentally conscious, flat over 2012, but higher than the 51% who said the same in 2009. Eighty percent said they would seek out "green" products, but only 30% were willing to pay extra for them, and 60% preferred using environmentally friendly cleaning supplies because of the chemicals in traditional products.

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