HEALTH

RCEC honors NPs during first Nat’l Clinic Week

BY Antoinette Alexander

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. —This year’s third annual Retail Clinician Education Congress, which was held at the whimsically themed Swan and Dolphin Resort located at the doorstep of Walt Disney’s Epcot, was especially “magical” as it attracted nearly 500 nurse practitioners and was held during the first official National Convenient Care Clinic Week.

“The reality is that we need accessible and affordable options for primary healthcare services, and all of you provide that and are part of a larger healthcare system,” Tine Hansen-Turton, executive director of the Convenient Care Association, told attendees.

Retail Clinician magazine, in conjunction with the Convenient Care Association, hosted the event Aug. 2 to 4. It convened in line with the start of National Convenient Care Clinic Week, which became official when Sens. Dan Inouye, D-Hawaii, and Thad Cochran, D-Miss., introduced Senate resolution 585.

Kicking off the conference, Lt. Col. Corina Barrow of the Army Nurse Corps and currently the Nurse Corps Detailee for Inouye, welcomed attendees and read from the resolution presented on the Senate floor by Inouye on July 22: “Mr. President, today I rise to recognize all of the providers who work in retail-based convenient care clinics and the resolution to designate Aug. 2 to Aug. 8, 2010, as National Convenient Care Clinic Week. National Convenient Care Clinic Week will provide a national platform from which to promote the pivotal services offered by the more than 1,100 retail-based convenient care clinics in the United States. Today, thousands of nurse practitioners, physician assistants and physicians provide care in convenient care clinics at a time when Americans are more and more challenged by the inaccessibility and high cost of health care.”

The three-day event included a panel discussion on the “Past, Present and Future of Convenient Care”—comprised of panelists Ken Berndt, director of Bellin FastCare; Web Golinkin, president and CEO of RediClinic; Sandy Ryan, chief nurse practitioner officer of Take Care Health Systems; Andrew Sussman, president of MinuteClinic; and Cynthia Graff, president and CEO of Lindora—as well as a keynote presentation on “The Future of Nursing” by Susan Hassmiller, senior adviser for nursing and director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing at the Institute of Medicine.

Nurse practitioners also participated in more than 14 live hours of continuing education, with topics ranging from the management of diabetes to identifying pediatric emergencies to respiratory conditions and treatments. The conference also featured an exhibit hall area where 25 different supplier companies demonstrated products for attendees.

In addition, the Retail Clinician/CCA CARE awards (see story) honored nurse practitioners, clinic leadership and those outside of the industry whose support has helped advance the model.

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Pittsburgh Business Group on Health’s LivingMyLife program to expand

BY Alaric DeArment

PITTSBURGH The Pittsburgh Business Group on Health’s LivingMyLife program, which helps diabetes patients with disease management through the use of “coach pharmacists,” will soon do the same for those with other diseases, according to published reports.

 

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported Friday that LivingMyLife also would help patients with asthma and heart disease. The program, which began in 2006, allows patients to manage their disease with visits to pharmacies, mostly Giant Eagle, Kmart and some independents.

 

 

The announcement was made at the annual healthcare symposium of the group and involved more than 100 attendees, the newspaper reported.

 

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DSC debunks industry misconceptions at briefing

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Congressional Dietary Supplement Caucus, in cooperation with two trade associations representing the dietary supplement industry — the Natural Products Association and the Council for Responsible Nutrition — held a briefing on Capitol Hill Thursday in an effort to debunk some of the untruths and misconceptions about the dietary supplement industry and its role in Americans’ wellness regimens.

“It’s all about prevention. Prevention is the new mantra among consumers,” suggested guest speaker Patrick Rea, publisher and editorial director of Nutrition Business Journal.

Speaking to an audience of staff members from the House of Representatives and Senate, Rea said that even during tough economic times, consumers turn to dietary supplements as an important part of their immunity and prevention plan.

“Consumers looked at supplements as one way through the recession to help take care of themselves. Health is recession resilient, and the sales over time support this fact,” Rea said.

Rea addressed several “industry myths” –– including the notions that dietary supplements are unnecessary because people get what they need from food, that people really do not want to take supplements, that the pharmaceutical industry will destroy the dietary supplement industry and that the industry is unregulated.

“Our numbers show that somewhere between 60% to 80% of Americans take supplements, and 48% of them consider themselves regular users,” Rea said.

Rea also mentioned the growing acceptance of dietary supplements among conventional health practitioners, and the growing trend among pharmaceutical companies to develop their own versions of products usually sold as supplements.

“In a study of healthcare professionals, 72% of physicians and 89% of nurses are dietary supplement consumers, and 79% of physicians and 82% of nurses recommend dietary supplements to their patients,” Rea noted.

Regarding industry regulation, Rea countered that the supplement industry is one of the more highly regulated industries and that the industry welcomes those regulations. “[For example], a lot of the [dietary supplement] companies are rallying behind the [good manufacturing practices] regulations,” he said. “They want it to be known that they are a GMP-compliant company. And, the Dietary Supplement Health Education Act made claims rules clear and has really helped the industry focus and develop.”

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