BEAUTY CARE

RapidLash joins ‘Wink Week!’

BY Antoinette Alexander

MASPHEE, Mass. RapidLash, which helps promote lush lashes and brows, is participating in the first-ever “Wink Week!”

Throughout the week of June 7 to June 11, RapidLash is encouraging women to celebrate their love for lashes by logging onto the RapidLash Facebook page and sending a RapidLash Wink to friends, family and fellow flirts. The application will be accessible on the page for the duration of Wink Week.

RapidLash also will be celebrating Wink Week on its Facebook page and on Twitter by sharing special content, quizzes and polls, and asking its community to share photos of their best winks and their tips on feeling confident, flirty and beautiful. For each wink up to 5,000, RapidLash will donate $1 toward cancer research in honor of Wink Week.

The manufacturer also is partnering with Match.com and is sponsoring the Wink functionality, where online daters send a wink to flirt with someone in whom they are interested. The sponsorship will run from May 29 to June 13.

RapidLash is an eyelash and eyebrow serum that promotes healthy, natural lashes and brows in 30 days. It is sold for $49.95 in the mass market.

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Kashi, Burt’s Bees team up for Day of Change tour

BY Allison Cerra

LA JOLLA, Calif. Kashi on Tuesday announced the launch of its fifth annual Day of Change tour; but this year, the natural food company is joining forces with Burt’s Bees.

Kashi’s 2010 Day of Change tour is free and open to the public. The experience begins as guests receive a “Passport to Change” with helpful tips, along with food and product information, to guide them on their journey through natural living. Next, visitors may participate in four interactive sessions:

  • Taste Here: Participants enjoy a sampling of Kashi’s tasty, better-for-you foods, including both favorite classics and new innovations;
  • Nourish Here: Visitors are encouraged to refresh themselves with personal care products from Burt’s Bees, including skin care, face, lip and body products;
  • Explore Here: Individuals participate in interactive displays and fun workshops on sustainability, why and how to look for natural ingredients in natural foods and products, and holistic health and wellness; and
  • Little Steps Here: People are invited to join the Kashi Community and Burt’s Bees Hive for more little steps. Participants can initiate their own personal change by making a simple pledge online — such as to plan an all-natural meal, get a good night’s sleep, or walk for 30 minutes — as their first step to embracing a healthier lifestyle

“Our Day of Change tour is an established program that we’re proud to continue offering as a means to educate and inspire individuals to achieve optimal health,” said Keegan Sheridan, natural food and lifestyle expert for Kashi. “In celebrating our fifth year, we are excited to partner with an established leader like Burt’s Bees and introduce people to even more ways in which they can embrace a natural lifestyle.”

The 2010 Day of Change tour features more than 50 unique events in more than 17 cities across the country through September.

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Report, PCPC sniff out truth on fragrances’ safety

BY Antoinette Alexander

WASHINGTON —A new report by activist group Campaign for Safe Cosmetics alleging that a number of popular brand-name perfumes and teen body sprays have “secret” chemicals that could be harmful to consumers is “erroneous” and “does a disservice to consumers,” stated John Bailey, chief scientist of the Personal Care Products Council, in response to the claim.

The report, titled “Not So Sexy: The Health Risks of Secret Chemicals in Fragrance,” was released on May 12 by the U.S.-based Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and the Environmental Working Group.

An analysis of 17 fragranced products conducted at an independent laboratory allegedly found that, according to the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, they contained “a dozen or more secret chemicals not listed on labels, multiple chemicals that can trigger allergic reactions or disrupt hormones, and many substances that have not been assessed for safety by the cosmetics industry’s self-policing review panels.”

“Something doesn’t smell right—clearly the system is broken,” stated Lisa Archer, national coordinator of the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics at the Breast Cancer Fund. “We urgently need updated laws that require full disclosure of cosmetics ingredients so consumers can make informed choices about what they are being exposed to.”

Responding to the report, Bailey stated: “The validity of the report is seriously undermined by its failure to include quantitative measurements of the ‘secret’ ingredients it purported to find. Such measurements are a fundamental element of toxicological risk assessments. Without them, it is impossible to make valid judgments about potential risks.”

“The report also erroneously alleges that many of the materials ‘revealed’ in their testing have not been assessed for safety. In fact, most of the ingredients have been the subjects of a safety assessment by one or more authoritative bodies,” he continued.

“Usage standards for fragrance are set based on the recommendations of a scientific panel of toxicologists, dermatologists, pathologists and environmental scientists that is overseen by the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, the research arm of the International Fragrance Association. The RIFM database contains a significant volume of information on fragrance materials,” he said.

With regard to the allegations of sensitization from fragrance ingredients, Bailey said that it has long been known that some people are sensitive to some natural or manmade materials in the environment. He also explained that because fragrance components are made up of so many substances, it is literally impossible to list them all on a product label. Given this, virtually all countries, including the European Union, allow fragrance ingredients to be declared on a label under the general term of “fragrance.”

With regard to the allegations in the report that some fragrance ingredients could be hormone disruptors, Bailey stated that this is “based on incomplete assessments of available scientific data about potential hormone effects and do not take into account actual exposure in cosmetic products. The studies relied upon in the allegations are not directly relevant to human exposure, and many of laboratory tests that have been done were completed under conditions that are not directly applicable to the use of these ingredients in cosmetic products. In some substances, the hormone effects measured are tens of thousands of times less than what would be expected to cause effects in humans. The weight of evidence in hormone disruption science today does not support the conclusions presented in this report.”

Bailey also stressed that cosmetic and personal care manufacturers take their safety requirements very seriously and that consumers can be confident in the safety of the products as cosmetic ingredients are carefully selected for safety and suitability for their specific applications.

Founded in 1894, the council has more than 600 member companies that manufacture, distribute and supply the vast majority of finished personal care products marketed in the United States.

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