HEALTH

Q&A: Handy work

BY Michael Johnsen

GoJo is gearing up for the 2012-2013 cough-cold season with a new lineup of Purell hand sanitizers, a factor that breathes new life into a commoditized category. Drug Store News caught up with Tim Cleary, sales VP for Purell Consumer, for the scoop on the relaunch.


DSN: Since H1N1, hand sanitizing has been a very private label-dominated, commoditized category. What is the opportunity for retailers in the current environment?


Tim Cleary: Brands are important. They drive categories and, if developed, will provide more reasons for consumer purchasing at a higher dollar ring. … In addition, retailers will gain incremental business with products for new usage occasions, such as with our portable 
on-the-go products.


DSN: What are the points of difference with your upgraded Purell Advanced line?


Cleary: [With the] more effective Purell Advanced formula, one squirt kills as many germs as two squirts of any other national brand. That’s better germ control and better value for the sanitizer purchase. … And because it includes skin conditioners and also is clinically proven to maintain skin moisture, we believe nonusers will try it, too. Nurses who sanitize up to 30 times per day have told us that they love this new product.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Cough-Cold & Allergy Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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2012 season peaks late

BY Michael Johnsen

As of the beginning of February, the cough-cold season had yet to materialize and illness levels were only just beginning to climb. If that’s the case, then an expected illness peak in late February/early March would make the 2011-2012 cough, cold and flu season one of the later-peaking seasons in recent years.


As of Jan. 21, overall incidence of upper respiratory illness this season was down 7.5% according to IMS Health, as compared with the 2010-2011 season.


The 2011 fall allergy season leading into 2012 was relatively flat as compared with a strong 2010 fall season. And this spring allergy season is expected to recover from a slow 2011 season, Scott Hanslip, IMS Consumer Health director sales, told Drug Store News. “We’re expecting a fairly strong spring [allergy season] in 2012. We’re going to see more of a turn back to normalized conditions,” he said. 


Two cough-cold subcategories that may deserve a look for the coming season are asthma and hand sanitization. Both IMS Health and King Bio will be marketing their asthma-care offerings — Azma.com and AsthmaCare, respectively. And GoJo Industries will be revitalizing its line of hand sanitizers for next season with an Advanced Purell line.

 

 

The article above is part of the DSN Category Review Series. For the complete Cough-Cold & Allergy Buy-In Report, including extensive charts, data and more analysis, click here.

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Oklahoma impact study: Rx-PSE would increase health costs without reducing meth issue

BY Michael Johnsen

EDMOND Okla. — According to a report prepared last month by the Economic Impact Group discerning the impact prescription-only pseudoephedrine would have on Oklahoma citizens, prescription-only PSE would result in almost 300,000 additional doctor’s office visits at an estimated cost reaching $60 million; $6 million would be directly borne by consumers.

In evaluating the potential cost limiting access of PSE will have on law-abiding consumers, the report also took a look at the effectiveness more restrictive access to PSE has in reducing methamphetamine abuse. Review of methamphetamine treatment admissions across multiple states with varying degrees of PSE restriction found no correlation between more restrictive regulations having any impact on methamphetamine abuse.

"The economic impact study in Oklahoma quantified what we already knew to be true: a prescription requirement for popular and reliable over-the-counter cold and allergy medicines will lead to higher healthcare costs for responsible consumers, lower productivity for Oklahoma businesses, and lost tax revenues for the state," stated Scott Melville, president and CEO of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association. "Effectively reducing meth production in Oklahoma is a critically important goal, but it’s important that methods employed to achieve that goal do not burden law-abiding Oklahomans with significant and unnecessary costs."

"The substitutability of [methamphetamine] products for consumers combined with the ease of access to local markets provided by existing gang infrastructure and relations with Mexican drug trafficking organizations suggests pseudoephedrine restrictions are less likely to reduce patterns of meth abuse," the report concluded. "In fact, society would likely trade one drug-related law enforcement concern for another … thus, the benefits to society may be muted, or even exacerbated, depending on the market behavior of [meth] suppliers in response to a policy shift."

The Economic Impact Group report was funded by a grant provided by CHPA.

For a copy of the report, click here.


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