HEALTH

PwC: Americans would use mobile devices to track, monitor health

BY Michael Johnsen

SAN DIEGO Three-in-10 Americans recently surveyed by PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute said they would use their cell or smart phone to track and monitor their personal health, and 40% would be willing to pay for a remote monitoring device that sends health information directly to their doctor.

The findings of the survey and new report, titled "Healthcare Unwired," were presented Wednesday by PricewaterhouseCoopers at the mHealth Initiative 2nd International mHealth Conference. According to the report, wireless technology, remote monitoring and mobile devices are changing the nature of health care, making it possible to deliver care anywhere in ways that are proving to reduce healthcare costs and keep people healthier.

 

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ research included a nationwide survey of 2,000 consumers and 1,000 physicians regarding their use and preferences for remote and mobile health services and devices. The survey found:

  • 31% of consumers said they would be willing to incorporate an application into their existing cell phone or smart phone to be able track and monitor their personal health information;
  • 40% of consumers said they would be willing to pay for a device and a monthly subscription fee for a mobile phone application that would send text and e-mail reminders to take their medications, refill prescriptions or access their medical records and track their health;
  • 27% of consumers said they would find medication reminders sent via text to be helpful, and men are twice as likely as women to say they would use a mobile device for health-related reminders; 40% of consumers also would be willing to pay for a remote monitoring device and a monthly subscription that would send data, such as heart rate, blood pressure, blood sugar and weight, automatically to their doctor;
  • 56% of consumers said they like the idea of remote health care, and 41% would prefer to have more of their care delivered via mobile device;
  • 88% of physicians reported they would like their patients to be able to track and/or monitor their health at home, particularly their weight, blood sugar levels and vital signs; and
  • 57% of physicians said they would like to use remote devices to monitor the patients outside of the hospital.

 

 

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute estimated the annual consumer market for remote/mobile monitoring devices and services to fall between $7.7 billion and $43 billion, based on the range that consumers said they would be willing to pay.

 

 

"Remote and mobile technology is making it possible to move healthcare delivery outside the traditional settings of physician offices and hospitals to wherever patients are,” stated Daniel Garrett, leader of the health information technology practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers. “New consumer-oriented business models and technologies are emerging. Companies that will be well-positioned competitively are those that can integrate mobile health into healthcare delivery and create value in the health system by helping doctors and their patients better manage health and wellness through mass personalization."

 

 

"There are significant opportunities for physicians, hospitals, health insurers, pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers to market and differentiate themselves using mobile health," Garrett added.

 

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Greenstone, Eisai to launch authorized generic of Aricept

BY Alaric DeArment

PEAPACK, N.J. The generics division of Pfizer will sell an authorized generic version of a drug used to treat dementia.

 

Greenstone said Wednesday that it had agreed with Eisai to launch donepezil hydrochloride tablets, an authorized generic of Aricept. The drug is used to treat dementia related to Alzheimer’s disease. Eisai makes the drug under a partnership with Pfizer.

 

 

“We are excited about the opportunity to work with Eisai to introduce this important authorized generic to patients,” said James Cannon, Greenstone’s VP business alliances. “First and foremost, our goal is to provide donepezil hydrochloride tablets to the broad customer base, and we also strive to remain competitive with other potential generic versions of the product.”

 

 

Unlike generic drugs, which are marketed in competition with their branded counterparts and must undergo an abbreviated regulatory approval process through the Food and Drug Administration, authorized generics are essentially branded drugs marketed under their generic names with the authorization of the original drug’s manufacturer and often through third-party companies.

 

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Lack of sleep may increase IFG risk, study finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Lack of beauty sleep may up one’s risk of developing a condition that leads to diabetes and heart disease, a new study found.

Researchers from Warwick Medical School and the State University of New York at Buffalo examined six years of data from 1,455 participants in the Western New York Health Study, all of whom were between the ages of 35 and 79 years, and found that people who sleep less than six hours a night may be three times more likely to develop incident-impaired fasting glycaemia. IFG causes the body to be unable to regulate glucose as efficiently as it should.

Lead author at Warwick Medical School Dr. Saverio Stranges said: "We found that short sleep, less than six hours, was associated with a significant, threefold increased likelihood of developing IFG, compared [with] people who got an average of six to eight hours sleep a night. Previous studies have shown that short sleep duration results in a 28% increase in mean levels of the appetite stimulating hormone ghrelin so it can affect feeding behaviors. Other studies have also shown that a lack of sleep can decrease glucose tolerance and increases the production of cortisol, a hormone produced in response to stress."

 

Stranges added that, "more research is needed, but our study does suggest a very strong correlation between lack of sleep and Type 2 diabetes and heart disease."

 

The study was published in the journal Annals of Epidemiology.

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