BEAUTY CARE

Procter & Gamble introduces new Braun series 9 electric shavers

BY Brian Berk

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble introduced the Braun Series 9 collection, a premium and exclusive range of electric shavers.

According to Procter & Gamble, The newest innovation of the Series 9 is its enhanced titanium coated trimmer, which offers detail, style, precision and performance for the “world's most efficient shave.” Central to the razor surface is a unique golden strip delivering optimal shave technology. The HyperLift & Cut Trimmer coated with Titanium Nitride improves the shaver’s ability to glide over the skin with a low level of friction, providing a pleasant and superior feel against the skin. It also protects from corrosion and wear, and increases durability, allowing the new Series 9 to deliver up to 50,000 shaves.

“Over the last few years we have witnessed a dramatic shift on the importance men place on looking their best before walking out of the door,” said Braun grooming expert Sascha Breuer. “Having a morning routine in place has proven to boost confidence for tackling the day ahead, and grooming is central to that routine because when you look good, you feel good. The best shaving tool to achieve that every day is the new Braun Series 9, which sets a new standard of excellence as it ensures the most efficient and exceptionally gentle shave.”

The new Series 9 collection is available in chrome, silver, black or blue finish and comes with a charger stand. It can be purchased at Target, Walmart, Amazon, Bed Bath & Beyond and Best Buy.

It has a suggested retail price of $389.99.

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BEAUTY CARE

Up and coming: Beauty formats — new and old — to continue expansion in 2017

BY DSN STAFF

Rather than watch the nail category continue to evaporate, retailers and brands are bonding together with innovative launches and impactful in-store presentations.

(To view the full Beauty Trends Report, click here.)

For the 52-week period ended Oct. 30, nail color sales were down 11.4% across multi-outlets, according to IRI. That’s prompting action.

CVS, for example, has a traffic-stopping new nail bar department in many of its stores, highlighted with Essie’s Gel Couture gel nail system and nail care tools. “It is an in-store destination with all the tools and trends for an at-home spa nail care experience,” said Alex Perez-Tenessa, VP beauty and personal care for CVS.

Several chains report strong movement out of the gates with Sally Hansen’s new Color Therapy, a collection created to offer on-trend colors and nail care benefits at the same time. One of the “hero” ingredients is argan oil, which has become sought after by consumers in many products across categories. “Sally Hansen has long stood for both color and care, and the Color Therapy line represents both of these,” said Shannon Curtin, SVP North America for Coty’s consumer beauty division.

Some chains are looking for more salon-style treatment options, such as the HealthyWiser Nail Care Tool Kit, which offers all the products needed to achieve a professional mani or pedi at home — safely. The product includes an electronic nail-filing device to avoid bruising from the usual filing.

Rite Aid, Walmart and Walgreens are among the chains pushing more deeply into nail care. Vitry is bringing high-quality repair products to drug stores with its Nail Care Repair, which one buyer said is gaining traction as people seek to strengthen nails after using gels.

Buyers also hope innovation in artificial nails will continue to build that business. According to IRI, artificial nails sales soared 10% in the 52-week period ended Oct. 30. That was one of only two positive growth segments within nail; the other was implements.

“Women are more open-minded and looking for something better than traditional nail polish and gels,” said Annette DeVita-Goldstein, SVP of global marketing at Kiss. Kiss is using more in-store education and consumer demonstrations to help women feel at ease with applications.

To read about four of the hottest nail products out now, check out the slideshow above.

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BEAUTY CARE

Taking a hint from Canadian drug stores

BY DSN STAFF

Consumer Suzanne Lee grew up in upstate New York, but moved to Ontario many years ago. Recently, upon visiting her hometown, she stopped at a local drug store for her favorite skin care product. She was surprised to find it wasn’t sold there.

(To view the full Beauty Trends Report, click here.)

“Funny, I never noticed until now how much better our drug stores are in Canada for beauty,” Lee acknowledged. “I was told my brand was a department store line in the United States.”

Her observations are spot-on. The United States and Canada may share borders, but the two countries have few similarities when it comes to cosmetics and fragrances.

Mass market cosmetics retailers have long envied the access Canadian retailers have to beauty brands that won’t distribute to American counterparts.

More European-inspired than American-influenced, Canada’s leading drug stores sell such brands as Clinique, Clarins, Lise Watier, Biotherm and Lancôme — names U.S. merchants only dream of stocking.

Service is superb — more Sephora than self-selection. And the stores pump out the sales and profits to boot. Estimates are that Canadian beauty departments produce sometimes twice the sales per sq. ft. of American mass beauty doors. Average beauty departments in U.S. stores typically generate less than 6% of total store sales, where Canadian units can hit almost 10% of overall cash register rings.

There are myriad reasons why Canadian stores get what U.S. stores can’t. Dating back 30 years, Canadian shoppers didn’t have as much access to department stores that were privy to premium brands. Often the population was so spread out it was prohibitive to pop into a department store to restock the makeup bag.

Consequently, those lines went where shoppers were — often in drug stores. One Shoppers Drug Mart beauty advisor explained it this way: “The high-end lines are a huge success here because they reach all corners of the population — not just cities.”

But the attractiveness stemmed from more than just getting to customers, but also from the fact that the environment in drug stores was better suited for the lines that often require hands-on service to demonstrate the value of spending more.

Over the years, other premium options have flourished in Canada, most notably Sephora, which has more than 30 units spread through eight provinces. Ulta Beauty hasn’t crossed the border yet, but could challenge the Canadian mass beauty universe if it did since the company also fuses mass and class. For now, consumers appear quite happy to shop at their local drug store.

The discount format hasn’t flourished as fast in Canada. In fact, Target retrenched when it found challenges getting enough foot traffic to support its stores.

Keeping Canada’s pharmacies abreast of trends thanks to constant visits from beauty companies is a major boost to the stores. Representatives from various lines make the rounds to stores. “They help train, offer demonstrations and help with displays,” said the Shoppers Drug Mart beauty expert. In the United States, buyers confirmed visits to stores are limited if at all.

Loic Steinbach, VP of Vitry USA, said Canadian retailers benefit from the high levels of service. “In Canada, there is an associate who greets you immediately. You will never find a consultant cleaning shelves. There is a difference in the approach of the cosmetics service in the stores.” During busy hours, many retailers even staff the beauty area with several consultants, he said.

Other business-building tools employed in Canada include financial incentives for beauty advisors, as well as plentiful demonstrations. Steinbach also said Canadian merchants turn their valuable front- and center-of-store real estate over to beauty. When it is located at the door, rather than on another floor or off to the side, customers must pass through beauty to get to the pharmacy counter — a good ploy since beauty often is an impulse purchase.

One obstacle in the United States to getting the best beauty staff is the lack of commissions with mass merchants lacking the funds to attract top-level people. However, as witnessed by the numbers, finding money in the budget could pay off.

To be sure, such U.S. drug chains as Walgreens and CVS are working feverishly to burnish service in America. CVS is removing housekeeping duties so beauty consultants can work one-on-one with customers. Its consultants also will be equipped with such tools as iPads.

Walgreens also is adding a new level of super-trained consultants to further enrich its customer interaction levels. The hope is that, over time, the United States will continue to attract new brands while enticing shoppers who have migrated to such specialty stores as Sephora back to chains.

Rite Aid and Target, as well, have upped the ante in service within beauty.

Still, U.S. retailers often head north for ideas and concepts to import into their departments. “There are a lot of things happening in Canada that could be done in the United States,” Steinbach said.

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