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Price Chopper acquires Fairway Pharmacy in Montrose, PA

BY David Salazar

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. — Price Chopper Supermarkets announced Tuesday that it had acquired the Montrose, PA-based Fairway Pharmacy. Until a new pharmacy is constructed inside Montrose’s Price Chopper location, operations will continue out of the acquired location. The Fairway team has joined Price Chopper, including owner Jerry Prusack, who will continue as the pharmacist at the acquired location.

“We are delighted to welcome Jerry and the Fairway team to the Price Chopper family,” Kathy Bryant, VP Pharmacy for Price Chopper, said. “We look forward to building upon the foundation of trusted and convenient pharmacy care that they have long provided to the Montrose community, while expanding and enhancing the patient services that are offered.”

As a result of the acquisition, Fairway customers now have access to Price Chopper’s savings programs and services like Fuel AdvantEdge rewards, free prenatal and children’s vitamins and free diabetes medications and diabetic supplies. The pharmacy’s hours have also expanded and Price Chopper is offering customers $25 off a new or transferred prescription until Nov. 7.

“We look forward to continuing to provide the high level of care that our patients have come to expect from us, and believe that the addition of support from Price Chopper’s highly regarded pharmacy division will increase our ability to serve the community,” Prusack said. “The construction of a brand new pharmacy inside the Price Chopper Supermarket marks a significant investment in our community that will provide our customers with the added convenience of one-stop shopping.”

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Realignment of Southwest division underscores Kroger commitment to Texas market

BY Michael Johnsen

CINCINNATI – Kroger on Tuesday split its Southwest division into two new supermarket divisions, a Dallas division and a Houston division, to support significant investment in the Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston markets. 
 
Dana Zurcher has been promoted to serve as president of the company's new Dallas division. And Bill Breetz, who has been serving as president of the Southwest division since 2002, will continue to oversee operations in Texas and Louisiana for the remainder of the year, and serve as president of the new Houston division. 
 
Kroger previously outlined capital investment plans of approximately $700 million in Dallas-Fort Worth and $500 million in Houston over the next three years. 
 
"We see opportunities for growth in both Dallas and Houston thanks in large part to Bill's leadership the past 13 years," stated Rodney McMullen, Kroger chairman and CEO. "This move will bring resources closer to our store teams, customers and communities."
 
Kroger's new Dallas division includes 105 stores in the Dallas and Fort Worth markets and in the Shreveport and Alexandria, La. area. The new Houston division includes 109 stores in the greater Houston region, as well as stores in Lake Charles, Louisiana. 
 
"Dana's experience spans several retail divisions, and she understands nearly every aspect of our business," McMullen said. "She is an exceptional leader who is known for helping associates discover their full potential. We are excited to have Dana lead our team in Dallas."
 
Zurcher brings 30 years of leadership experience to her new role. She began her Kroger career in Indianapolis store management in 1985. She served in a number of leadership roles in the Central division, including store manager and district coordinator. In 2002, she was named a district manager in the company's Fry's division in Phoenix. In 2008, she was promoted to director of operations for the Ralphs division in Los Angeles, where she served until she was promoted to VP operations for Kroger's Mid-South division in 2011. She has served in her current role of VP operations Southwest division since 2013. 
 
 

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Can 1 great hire equal 3 good hires?

BY Dan Mack

The Idea: Kip Tindell, CEO and Chairman of The Container Store, founded the company in 1978 with $35k, and a set of brave ideals. This retailer of "empty boxes" was profitable on day one and has enjoyed a historical average compounded growth rate of 21%. Equally important, it's been named one of the Best Places to Work in the U.S. 15 years in a row, debuting at #1 the first year they applied in 2000. What has been their secret? They hire the best talent with amazingly high expectations.

In a recent interview, Tindell joked that the company’s mantra is guided by a simple principle that “no one’s over-qualified to work as a sales associate at the Container Store.” In fact, in order to work at the store, potential employees must go through a far more rigorous interview process, while being evaluated against the Container Stores main belief: hire one person that’s worth three

The Container Store story is not a sexy business, nor is it the type of industry that seems ripe to steal tomorrow’s business school leaders. The organization makes containers and organizers for homes, offices or anyone looking to store things.  But the company is vibrant, attracts great employees, pays higher than most service industries and is worth dissecting.   

The organization pays their employees 50%-100% more than the average retailer and prides themselves on their team’s productivity, while only having a 10% annual turnover. How do they do all of this?

  1. Find the most educated employees through a 6-8 step interview process.
  2. Pay them well, very well.
  3. Train and development them like they are your next generation of leaders

By creating a creating a culture of excitement and rewarding valuable team members, a retail store has become a top tier sales organization. Their principles are universal, and it works.

Finding the right talent is expensive but crucial — it allows people to live and love their work which creates a culture of excellence.  Hiring game breaking talent and paying wages commensurate with their skills drives retention and allows the next generation of leadership to commit to the cause.

When those three principles are married, you have the formula for a very special culture.  The Container Store is one such culture.


For more insights on Dan Mack and the Elevation Forum go to mackelevationforum.com.  To learn about his first book Dark Horse: How Challenger Companies Rise to Prominence visit darkhorsebook.com.

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