HEALTH

Pharmavite names Brooks vice president of science, technology

BY Michael Johnsen

NORTHRIDGE, Calif. Pharmavite earlier this month named James Brooks to vice president, science and technology.

“We are very enthusiastic about James joining the Pharmavite team,” stated Connie Barry, Pharmavite president and chief executive officer. “The more than 20 years of management experience be brings fromthe food science, plant physiology and product development sectors will help further solidify Pharmavite as an industry leader committed to offering high-quality, science-based products. We also look forward to leveraging his development and research experience on soy-based nutritional products to drive growth for the SOYJOY business in theU.S.”

Brooks, who will report to Barry, previously served as the head of research and product development for Bolthouse Farms, a privately held company that sells retail beverages, juice concentrates, fiber and fresh produce. He has also held research and development and senior scientific positions with Syngenta in the Netherlands, Campbell Soup Co., Nestle and Abbott Laboratories.

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CHPA president addresses OTC efficacy, drug abuse

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON During her opening address to Consumer Healthcare Products Association members here, Linda Suydam, president of the CHPA, noted that two Food and Drug Administration meetings held last year have forever changed the over-the-counter regulatory landscape.

The two meetings Syudam referenced—an FDA advisory panel on the efficacy of children’s cough-cold medicine and a separate panel on the efficacy of phenylephrine—called into question the long-standing efficacy of monographed products. “What was learned from both of these meetings is that the regulatory landscape is changing,” she said. “We must move forward on the science supporting our product.”

To this end, CHPA is already committed to conducting pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies in pediatric populations for monographed OTC medicines.

Another point of concern identified by Suydam was the issue of dextromethorphan abuse. She commended the industry for pulling together on this issue, and through CHPA effectively raised awareness and education behind DXM abuse. “The level of cooperation among members this past year has been exceptional.”

Looking forward, the industry prognosis is positive, however not without its challenges. For example, “FDA’s chronic underfunding will take a long time to rectify,” Suydam said, regardless of whether a Democrat or a Republican wins the presidential election next year.

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Study examines energy drinks’ tooth-damaging potential

BY Michael Johnsen

CHICAGO A recently-published study has determined that energy drinks as corrosive to teeth as soft drinks.

The Academy of General Dentistry on Wednesday issued a press release regarding the results of a recent study that was published in the November/December 2007 issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry’s clinical, peer reviewed journal, which found that popular high-energy and sports drinks had the highest mean buffering capacity, resulting in the strongest potential for erosion of enamel.

According to the Academy, a beverage’s “buffering capacity,” or the ability to neutralize acid, plays a significant role in the cause of dental erosion.

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