HEALTH

Pharmavite launches Voots supplements for children

BY Rebecca Haughey

NORTHRIDGE, Calif. – Pharmavite has introduced Voots Veggie-Fruit Tarts, a fruit- and vegetable- based supplement for children ages 4 years and older that provides the antioxidants found in three servings of fruits and vegetables in two chewable berry-flavored tarts.

Voots are made with a blend of 11 fruits and vegetables and are blended with vitamin C and other ingredients before being pressed into tablets. Voots do not contain any artificial flavors, colors or preservatives. The tablets come in convenient single-serve packets so that kids can enjoy them on-the-go.

"The introduction of the Voots brand showcases [Pharmavite’s] commitment to expanding its product offerings for people of all ages," said Pharmavite’s VP marketing Erin O’Malia Gehan. "This is Pharmavite’s first children’s brand, and we are proud to be able to help busy parents provide their kids with a boost of antioxidants in the form of delicious tarts that kids will love."

Voots Veggie-Fruit tarts are available at select Sam’s Clubs and Target stores nationwide, and can be purchased on Amazon.com. The suggested retail price is $9.99 for a 14-count carton.

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British study: Swiss echinacea extract helps prevent common cold

BY Michael Johnsen

AUSTIN, Texas — British researchers have concluded that a Swiss echinacea extract is both safe and effective in helping to prevent symptoms of the common cold, according to a study published in American Botanical Council’s peer-reviewed journal HerbalGram

Researchers tested 673 healthy people to see if the use of an extract of echinacea root and herb was safe and effective in preventing cold symptoms over a four-month period. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial used Echinaforce, an alcoholic extract of the leaves (95%) and roots (5%) of organically grown echinacea (Echinacea purpurea).

The results showed that subjects using the Swiss echinacea extract had significantly fewer incidences of cold or flu symptoms — 149 colds, while subjects in the placebo group reported 188 colds. 

"It is heartening and refreshing to see such positive conclusions coming from this largest echinacea clinical trial ever published," stated Mark Blumenthal, executive director of the American Botanical Council. "While there have been previous clinical studies producing mixed results on the efficacy of various types of echinacea preparations, used at different dosage levels, and in different types of study design, this highly impressive clinical trial is historic due to its size," he said. "It employed a high-quality, well-researched echinacea product [and] a credible study design, and had enough people to produce statistically significant positive results."

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P.SIOUSSAT says:
Oct-19-2012 11:26 pm

This product is available from all major natural products distributors.

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Study: Regular blood glucose monitoring increases medication adherence

BY Michael Johnsen

MILPITAS, Calif. — Blood glucose monitoring is associated with reduced A1C levels and greater adherence to medication in Type 2 diabetes patients who do not take insulin, according to a study published in the September issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

The preliminary study findings were based on a retrospective analysis of health insurance data and was led by Lifescan’s Naunihal Virdi. The results are based on an analysis of 4.5 years of data gathered from 5,172 patients with Type 2 diabetes who were newly treated with noninsulin diabetes medication. Patients who tested their blood glucose showed a greater overall decrease in A1C than those not testing (-1.4 vs. -0.6 A1C percentage points respectively). Overall, higher blood glucose testing frequency was associated with greater decreases in A1C levels. Patients who tested at least once per day had the greatest reductions in A1C levels compared with patients who tested less frequently, or not at all.

This study also found that patients who tested their blood glucose were more likely to take their diabetes medication as prescribed than patients who didn’t test (49.9% vs. 38.2%, respectively). Again, testing frequency was a factor, with 64.1% of patients who tested at least once a day being adherent to their medications compared to less than 50% of those testing less frequently.

“Good glycemic control is key to reducing complications in patients with diabetes,” Virdi said. “For Type 2 patients who don’t take insulin, this study adds to the growing body of evidence that regular self-monitoring of blood sugar may contribute to improved diabetes control, as well as improved compliance in taking medications as prescribed.”

The study findings were based on a retrospective analysis of health insurance data and are considered by the authors as preliminary to other studies that may confirm these findings via a prospective clinical trial. To view the abstract of the study, click here

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