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Pharmaprix Run for Women series to come to Quebec City

BY Antoinette Alexander

QUEBEC CITY, Quebec — Shoppers Drug Mart, which operates under the Pharmaprix banner in Quebec, has announced that Canada’s first and only national women’s and girl’s running race series expanded to six cities.

The Pharmaprix Run for Women Series consists of a 5K, 10K and Little Steps Girls 1K, and includes a motivational talk from an iconic Canadian Olympian in each city. A portion of proceeds and participant donations will go towards women’s mental health programs in each of the six race cities.

The events kicked off on June 22 in Unionville, Ontario, and continued throughout the summer into September. In addition to Unionville (June 22), Vancouver (July 13) and Calgary (July 27), runs were in Halifax (Aug. 10) and Ottawa (Aug. 24). A run will be held in Quebec City on Sept. 21.
Five-time Paralympian, Chantal Petitclerc, is the featured speaker in Quebec City.  She will speak to girls and women about being active and how they can succeed in the goals they set.

Other speakers included five-time Olympian Hayley Wickenheiser, (Vancouver), Gold and Silver Medalist Jennifer Heil (Unionville and Calgary) and Gold medalist and Women’s World Cup Rugby Leading Scorer, Heather Moyse (Halifax).

The event in Quebec City will support Fondation de l’Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec.

According to l’Institut de la statistique du Québec, 27% of women, aged 15 and older, have lived with a mental disorder at one time in their live. Major depression is the leading cause.

Postpartum depression affects about 20% of new mothers, 10% of women also will suffer from depression during pregnancy, not to mention that 1-out-of-1,000 will face a psychosis symptom during this period. Dr. Marie-Josée Poulin is familiar with these women. She is the leader of the only perinatal psychiatric clinic in the province based at l’Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec. Each year, Poulin follows between 300 and 350 women from the moment when they wish to have a baby until the child’s second birthday.

Other sponsors include Moving Comfort who will be offering bra-fitting clinics at Running Room stores leading up to each event.

 

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Healthy lifestyles and the education gap

BY Jim Frederick

Attention, community pharmacists! How well do you know your patients?

A new study from a Canadian sociologist sheds new light on the health habits of middle-aged Americans, and asserts that those with higher educational levels are significantly more likely to pursue healthier behaviors than their less-educated peers.

The study, authored by Rachel Margolis, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Western Ontario, and published in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, shows that college-educated Americans between the ages of 50 years and 75 years are much less likely to smoke and are more likely to stay physically active than those with a high school education or less. As reported last week by Drug Store News, Margolis cited “very large differences by education in smoking and physical activity trajectories in middle age.”

So, as a pharmacist, you might consider putting special emphasis on your less-educated patients when providing disease-state counseling, medication therapy management and other clinical services and interventions. And if your store or company provides smoking cessation classes, you might consider giving those patients an extra boost to encourage them to sign up!

That said, I’m curious whether pharmacists in different parts of the United States can fully corroborate Margolis’ findings. If you practice in a community setting, do you find marked differences in healthy behaviors, lifestyles, exercise levels or eating habits among your patients depending on their level of education or other socio-economic markers? Click on the comment button to share your thoughts; as always, your feedback is most welcome.

 

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J&J to add red warning label to Tylenol in effort to raise awareness on appropriate dosing

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — Johnson & Johnson last week reported it will add a red warning to caps of Tylenol to reinforce the risks of taking too much acetaminophen, the Associated Press reported last week. 

The alert will appear on the caps of Extra Strength Tylenol beginning in October, according to the report. 

The new warning on Tylenol caps will read: “Contains Acetaminophen” and “Always Read the Label.”

 

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