BEAUTY CARE

P&G recalls certain bottles of Scope mouthwash

BY Antoinette Alexander

CINCINNATI Procter & Gamble has voluntarily recalled some bottles of its Scope Original Mint and Peppermint mouthwash due to a possible malfunctioning child-resistant cap and lack of a required health hazard statement, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission announced.

This recall involves some bottles of Scope Original Mint and Scope Peppermint mouthwash in 1-liter sizes. The recalled bottles have the number “4” on the bottom of the bottle. The bottles with the “4” on the bottom may not be child-resistant. Consumers also can attempt to twist the cap open and if the cap can be twisted off without squeezing the tabs on the cap, the package is not child-resistant.

According to the recall, the mouthwash contains ethyl alcohol and certain bottles have malfunctioning child-resistant caps and lack the statement, “This package for households without young children,” as required by the Poison Prevention Packaging Act. Ethyl alcohol is toxic and can cause serious injury or death if ingested by children. No injuries have been reported.

The mouthwash was sold at drug stores, grocery stores and other retailers nationwide and in Canada between January and June for about $4.

Consumers should keep this product out of the reach of children. Consumers who purchased the product with the expectation that it would be in child-resistant packaging can contact Procter & Gamble for a full refund or a replacement coupon. Adult consumers can continue to use the product as directed.

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Professional skin care market takes a hit, Kline reports

BY Antoinette Alexander

LITTLE FALLS, N.J. The recession has taken its toll on the professional skin care market, but that hasn’t stopped marketers from rolling out new products, many of which are designed to fight the signs of aging, according to a recent study by consulting and research firm Kline.

According to Kline’s “Professional Skin Care 2009 Global Series: Market Analysis and Opportunities” report, Europe and the United States posted “substantial declines,” with the exception to the trend coming from the BRIC markets spearheaded by Brazil, which posted growth of 11.1%.

“The recession’s impact in Europe and the United States resulted in a change in spending patterns, a decline in the frequency of visits to spas and physician’s offices, and a shift to lower-priced brands,” stated Karen Doskow, industry manager for Kline. “But even in the face of a gloomy economy, industry leaders fought back with a healthy flow of new product launches, many of which targeted the anti-aging segment.”

Doskow further explained that “products that were unique, multitasking or offering dual benefits certainly stood out for the recession-stricken consumer. Professional skin care marketers acknowledged the need to diversify, segment and innovate their offerings in order to cater to a change in demand for the products that are preventative or that are proven to help reverse signs of aging.”

The report found that anti-aging products accounted for 41.1% in the United States and nearly 50% of sales in Europe and Brazil. Product trends varied on a worldwide basis — skin whitening was a No. 1 concern for marketers in China and Japan, and anticellulite treatments were a top priority in Europe and Brazil.

The direct sales channel in the U.S. professional market posted a 10% increase, making it a top trend for the year. In this channel, marketers not only intensified their support of accounts with business-building tools, but they also took charge of building relationships directly with customers through podcasts, YouTube clips and member-only clubs. Incorporating social media outlets into their marketing strategy has become the standard practice in recent years, allowing marketers to reach out directly to the customer.

This, in turn, is quickly becoming a dominant way to reinforce brand imaging and promote new products.

Looking ahead, Kline predicted that the professional skin care market for the United States will grow by a CAGR of 5.6% through 2014, or if exceptional conditions prevail, the market could grow as high as 11.3% a year. Medical care providers, achieving the strongest growth rate, would boost sales.

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Kiss My Face wants consumers to give ‘peace’ a chance

BY Antoinette Alexander

NEW YORK Natural personal care company Kiss My Face has teamed up with nonprofit group Seeds of Peace to launch Peace Soap and to introduce an online campaign dubbed “The Pledge for Peace.”

Seeds of Peace is a nonprofit, nonpolitical organization that hosts a summer camp to empower young people from regions of conflict with the leadership skills and interpersonal networks needed to advance reconciliation and coexistence.

Through the partnership, Kiss My Face will donate 10% of all profits from Peace Soap to Seeds of Peace. The donation is earmarked for programming and supporting camp efforts.  

“The Pledge of Peace” campaign is designed to send campers from all over the world to the Seeds of Peace summer camp during the 2011 season (a cost of $6,000 per camper). For every 10,000 pledges that are made, Kiss My Face will sponsor a Seeds of Peace camper. There is no limit to the number of kids that Kiss My Face will sponsor.

To make a free “pledge” consumers can either click a button on the Kiss My Face Facebook page or enter their e-mail addresses at ThePledgeForPeace.com. The campaign will run from June 21 to Sept. 21.

Peace Soap is available in grassy mint, lavender mandarin, lemongrass clary sage and pomegranate acai for $9.99 (17 oz.) and $15.99 (34 oz.). As of June, Peace Soap can be purchased at Whole Foods Market, Target, KissMyFace.com and other stores where natural products are sold.

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