HEALTH

Pfizer debuts Advil testimonial starring Jon Bon Jovi

BY Michael Johnsen

ADISON, N.J. — Pfizer Consumer Healthcare on Thursday unveiled a Jon Bon Jovi testimonial as its latest commercial that’s part of its "Advil Stories" campaign.

“Our ‘Advil Stories’ campaign emphasizes that everyone experiences physical pain for some reason in their lives, no matter who they are," said Srini Sripada, senior director pain management for Pfizer Consumer Healthcare. "We know that Advil consumers are our greatest ambassadors and that pain is something we all share. We are excited to showcase the true stories from pain sufferers who are finding relief with Advil, and we are thrilled that Jon is sharing his story with America.”

“Pain does not have much of a place in my life. I checked the schedule and it’s not on it. You never know when Advil is needed,” Bon Jovi said. According to Pfizer, Jon injured his calf muscle on stage last year while entertaining a hometown crowd in New Jersey. He later revealed in an interview that he relies on Advil to get through the inevitable aches and pains that come with touring, setting the stage for his true Advil story. In the advertisement, which debuted Dec. 9, Jon joined other Advil users, including recently-retired talk show host Regis Philbin, who have told their stories of pain and relief in Advil’s current testimonial-style campaign.

The TV ad was shot in Red Bank, N.J., at the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Kitchen, a community kitchen that recently opened as an initiative of the Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation.

The "Advil Stories" campaign launched last year. All of the stories can be viewed at TakeAdvil.com.


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Report: AgaMatrix gains FDA approval for iPhone blood glucose meter

BY Michael Johnsen

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — According to a report published Wednesday on the site of MobiHealthNews, the Food and Drug Administration has approved an iPhone glucose meter called AgaMatrix Nugget from Sanofi. "Sanofi has long planned to sell the AgaMatrix Nugget (also called the iGBStar) in the United States. It began offering the device in Europe earlier this year," MobiHealthNews reported.

AgaMatrix entered into a global marketing deal with Sanofi in March 2010 "for the development, supply and commercialization of blood-glucose monitoring solutions. Earlier this year, AgaMatrix partnered with Perrigo to provide a line of store-brand blood-glucose meters.

AgaMatrix already offers an iPhone app for people looking for help managing diabetes. (To check out the app, click here.)

For the full MobiHealthNews story, click here.

 


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Study: Low vitamin D levels associated with risk factor for diabetes

BY Michael Johnsen

CHEVY CHASE, Md. — A recent study of obese and nonobese children found that low vitamin D levels are significantly more prevalent in obese children and are associated with risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. This study was accepted for publication in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

High rates of vitamin D deficiency have been found in obese populations and past studies have linked low vitamin D levels to cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms by which obesity and its co-morbidities are related to vitamin D deficiency are not fully known. This new study examined associations between vitamin D levels and dietary habits in obese children, and tested whether there were correlations between vitamin D levels and markers of abnormal glucose metabolism and blood pressure.

“Our study found that obese children with lower vitamin D levels had higher degrees of insulin resistance,” stated Micah Olson of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and lead author of the study. “Although our study cannot prove causation, it does suggest that low vitamin D levels may play a role in the development of Type 2 diabetes.”

In this study, researchers measured vitamin D levels, blood sugar levels, serum insulin, BMI and blood pressure in 411 obese subjects and 87 control nonoverweight subjects. Study participants also were asked to provide dietary information, including daily intake of soda, juice and milk; average daily fruit and vegetable intake; and whether or not they routinely skipped breakfast.



“Poor dietary habits, such as skipping breakfast and increased soda and juice intake, were associated with the lower vitamin D levels seen in obese children,” Olson said. “Future studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of lower vitamin D levels in obese children, the amount and duration of treatment necessary to replenish vitamin D levels in these children and whether treatment with vitamin D can improve primary clinical endpoints such as insulin resistance.”

Other researchers working on the study included Naim Maalouf, Jon Oden, Perrin White and Michele Hutchison of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

The article, “Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Children and Its Relationship to Glucose Homeostasis,” will appear in the January 2012 issue of JCEM.

 


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