PHARMACY

Pfizer completes Excaliard acquisition

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — Pfizer completed its acquisition of a drug maker that focuses on the development of skin scarring treatments.

Pfizer said its acquisition of Excaliard Pharmaceuticals will allow the company to develop "new and innovative treatments to address unmet medical needs," noting that there currently is no excessive skin scarring treatment approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

Financial terms of the deal, which was announced last month, were not disclosed; however, Pfizer said it provided Excaliard’s shareholders — which include Isis Pharmaceuticals, Alta Partners, ProQuest Investments and RiverVest Venture Partners — an upfront payment and will make contingent payments if certain milestones are achieved in the future.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Mylan generic drug for HIV/AIDS receives tentative FDA approval through PEPFAR

BY Alaric DeArment

PITTSBURGH — Under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the Food and Drug Administration has given tentative approval to a generic HIV and AIDS drug made by Mylan, the company said.

The drug maker’s Mylan Labs subsidiary received tentative approval for atazanavir sulfate and ritonavir tablets in the 300-mg/100-mg strength. The FDA’s tentative approval of the drug under PEPFAR means it will be eligible for purchase in certain developing countries.

Mylan said the drug was the first heat-stable, fixed-dose combination of the two drugs. The World Health Organization also "pre-qualified" the drug as a second-line treatment option for HIV and AIDS, the company said.

Atazanavir sulfate is a generic version of Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Reyataz, while ritonavir is a generic version of Abbott Labs’ Norvir.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

PHARMACY

Lilly study to determine why many diabetes patients don’t reach blood-glucose goals

BY Alaric DeArment

INDIANAPOLIS — Many people with Type 2 diabetes have managed to integrate the treatments they must take into their daily lives, but many do not reach their blood-glucose goals after they start insulin therapy.

Drug maker Eli Lilly is partnering with Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston in a study that started in July and has enrolled 4,500 people in 17 countries to find out why many people with the disease resist a progression of insulin therapy.

Dubbed "MOSA1c," the study will gather data on insulin use, interactions between people who have and are treating diabetes and other factors involved in the progression of treatments.

"Fewer than half of people with diabetes reach their target goals for glycemic control, putting them at risk for complications like blindness, amputation, heart disease and kidney failure," Brigham and Women’s Hospital physician, Harvard Medical School professor and study investigator William Shrank said. "The goal of this study is to determine the barriers that prevent patients from optimizing their insulin treatment, whether that is a lack of communication, health system hurdles or emotional responses."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Retail Health Provider e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES