HEALTH

Omron turns up home blood pressure monitoring promotion with TV doctor

BY DSN STAFF

BANNOCKBURN, Ill. —Omron Healthcare earlier this month joined forces with “The Dr. Oz Show” in an integrated media partnership to help spread the word about the importance of home blood pressure monitoring.

The Omron Healthcare integration included a sponsored segment on “The Dr. Oz Show’s” premiere episode, which aired Sept. 7, in addition to a consumer incentive that was revealed by Dr. Oz during the show. The first 50,000 viewers to visit DoctorOz.com were able to download a $10 coupon good on any Omron Healthcare home blood pressure monitor at participating retailers.

“High blood pressure is a growing concern in the United States among adults, and is often referred to as the ‘silent killer,’” stated Ranndy Kellogg, Omron Healthcare VP marketing and product development. “We’re thrilled to align with ‘America’s Doctor’ in the Sept. 7 season premier to help spread the word about the importance of home blood pressure monitoring, further helping to decrease the risk of heart disease and increase life expectancy.”

As many as 1-in-3 people suffer from high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association. Monitoring blood pressure at home is an important step people can take to reduce their risk of a heart attack or stroke, Omron stated. More than 50% of people with high blood pressure who monitor at home show an improvement in medication compliance and are quicker to take action.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

Re-evaluating Chinese currency remains a bad idea

BY Alaric DeArment

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT’S IMPORTANT Herbert Hoover is alive and well — and picking up his prescriptions at the local drug store.

(THE NEWS: Retailers urge Congress to reject Chinese currency legislation. For the full story, click here.)

Of course, he isn’t. But if he were, he might have some advice to offer current members of Congress and occupants of the White House based on his experience with the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930, which attempted to rescue the U.S. economy by imposing tariffs on imported goods, but instead ignited a trade war that many historians blame for deepening the Great Depression.

The legislation to impose tariffs on Chinese imports as a way to force it to revalue the yuan is based on the assumption that China manipulates its currency to make its manufactured goods more competitive in the U.S. market. Thus, the reasoning goes, if China were to revalue the yuan, it would help American manufacturers by making Chinese imports more expensive and American goods more competitive in China, thereby helping to ease the U.S.-China trade deficit, which totaled $226.9 billion last year and has so far reached more than $145 billion this year, according to U.S. Census data.

But it’s not that simple. In 1930, the United States manufactured most of its own consumer goods; but that’s no longer true, and the bulk of consumer goods, from toys to digital cameras, now come from China. Also frequently lost in the melee is the fact that most of the supposedly Chinese goods are not Chinese at all, but rather products with American, Japanese, Korean and European brands that are assembled in China. Unlike in the 1970s and 1980s, when such Japanese companies as Sony were eating the lunch of such American counterparts as General Electric, the “Made in China” label now graces the products of both.

For that reason, if legislators imposed big tariffs on Chinese goods or if China dramatically revalued the yuan, it would simply force retailers to pass the extra costs to consumers. So after picking up his prescriptions, Hoover would find the digital camera he had planned to buy from behind the counter noticeably more expensive. While this would not likely lead to another Great Depression, it would certainly diminish consumers’ purchasing power.

As for the manufacturing jobs, many experts have said they would simply migrate to cheaper countries rather than returning to the United States. This trend already is under way in textiles, as many clothing companies have started moving factories from China to such countries as Bangladesh in response to the increasing costs of manufacturing in China.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

j.hoston says:
Mar-20-2013 04:21 am

A brief introduction and definition on quality organization systems significance of quality, quality audits, audit objective, process of auditing & quality control tackle. Quality Audit Bangladesh

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

‘Smoking Sucks,’ but quitting doesn’t with new cessation lollipops

BY Allison Cerra

WEST HILLS, Calif. Kicking the habit never tasted so good.

Three Lollies, the maker of PreggiePops and QueasyDrops, has launched Smoking Sucks lollipops for those looking to quit smoking. The new line of smoking-cessation pops are formulated with essential oils and amino acids, including L-tryptophan, which is a naturally occurring amino acid that some sources believe may help with cravings when people are attempting to quit smoking, Three Lollies said.

The pops are available in wintergreen, pineapple and cinnamon varieties.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES