HEALTH

Omron launches upgraded TENS unit

BY Michael Johnsen

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — Omron Healthcare on Tuesday announced the release of its new Pain Relief Pro electroTHERAPY unit. Its versatility delivers more settings and more power for more relief with 10 power levels and eight pre-set modes.

Electrotherapy TENS units are a prescription-free pain relief option recommended by professionals and favored by a growing number of acute and chronic pain sufferers. TENS, which stands for Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation, uses gentle pulses to stimulate nearby nerves and is thought to scramble pain messages to the brain, stimulate the production of endorphins (the body’s natural pain reliever) and improve blood circulation.

“We developed the new Pain Relief Pro with our customers in mind. They wanted more options for every day pain management. The result is a small but powerful device that’s simple to use and easily customized for quick relief,” said Maureen Perou, senior product manager, Omron Healthcare. “With an intuitive design that has more pain modes, power levels of intensity and now a massage feature, this smartphone sized unit can be the difference between staying home in bed or getting up and getting out of the house.”

The new Pain Relief Pro includes five pre-set pain modes (arm, lower back, leg, foot and joint) and three massage modes (tap, knead, rub) to target the most common problem spots. Ten power levels of intensity allow users to create a personalized experience.

The Pain Relief Pro will be selling for a suggested retail price of $69.99. 

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FDA advisory panel to consider OTC status of NSAIDs

BY Michael Johnsen

SILVER SPRING, Md. — A pair of Food and Drug Administration advisory committees will be meeting Feb. 10 to talk about heart risks associated with use of NSAIDs and whether or not Bayer’s Aleve (naproxen) carries a lower risk profile than other NSAIDs. The FDA is also considering potentially revoking OTC status of certain nonprescription NSAIDS, according to published reports

However, the lower doses of OTC pain relievers relative to prescription-only and the short duration those pain relievers are supposed to be used to alleviate acute pain could be factors in favor of keeping ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen as nonprescription pain relief options.

In addition, FDA is asking advisers to consider whether an ongoing safety study of Pfizer’s Celebrex as compared to ibuprofen and naproxen should continue as naproxen is seen as safer. 

The labeling for non‐prescription NSAIDs was revised in 2005 to include more specific information about potential cardiovascular and GI risks following the recalls of cox-2 inhibitors Vioxx and Bextra.

Three NSAIDs are approved in the U.S. for over-the-counter use: ibuprofen at doses up to 1,200mg/day, ketoprofen at doses up to 75 mg/day and naproxen at doses up to 660 mg/day.

 

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CRN addresses study claiming children’s vitamins generally exceed RDAs

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Monday helped to tone down the conclusions of a recent study reported by Reuters Health that found vitamin supplements marketed for infants and children contained more than the recommended amount of individual vitamins. 

Specifically, the study found that supplements marketed for older children contained five times the recommended amount of vitamin C. And the average amount of biotin in children’s supplements was as much as nine times the RDA. 

According to the report, researchers found that in all but one case (vitamin D) the average vitamin content of those supplements exceeded what’s recommended. "What we did is compare what’s on the labels for [children’s vitamins] to the recommended daily allowance or adequate intake," Michael Madden, lead author of the study from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, told Reuters Health.

However, the study did not identify any health concerns with use of the children’s supplements. 

According to CRN SVP scientific and regulatory affairs Duffy MacKay, the recommended daily allowances as issued by the Institute of Medicine haven’t been updated recently. Further, he suggested to Reuters Health, the new study did not distinguish between multivitamins and single-letter vitamins. "There are reasons why some of the vitamins would contain more than the RDA," he said. For instance, single vitamin supplements could be made for kids who are deficient in that particular vitamin.

MacKay recommended parents read the supplement label and ascertain whether or not to give the supplement to their children after talking to their pediatrician. 

 

 

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