HEALTH

Oklahoma considers registry for meth convicts

BY Michael Johnsen

OKLAHOMA CITY The Oklahoma House Public Safety Committee voted on Wednesday to create a state registry of meth offenders similar to the sex-offender registry as part of House Bill 3380, the Oklahoma Methamphetamine Offender Registry Act. The measure now moves for consideration by the entire Oklahoma House of Representatives.

“The meth offender registry will help the public identify potential threats in their neighborhoods and increase scrutiny on individuals who have been involved in meth production and distribution,” stated Rep. Randy Terrill, R-Moore. “The increased public awareness should help deter these criminals from future crimes or lead to their swift arrest if they recidivate.”

“This is an important public safety measure and I am pleased it has received committee passage,” added Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore. “Once it passes the full House, I look forward to moving it through the Senate and hopefully on to the governor.”

Under the bill, those convicted of possession, manufacture or distribution of methamphetamine would be required to register with the state.

Individuals listed in the registry due to a previous meth conviction will be blocked from purchasing pseudoephedrine at any pharmacy. Additionally, those listed in the Methamphetamine Offender Registry will be prohibited from possessing pseudoephedrine.

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Control would maintain the registry, which would include the following information: name of the offender, date of birth, offenses and conviction, and county where the offense occurred.

Over the past two years, a new recipe has surfaced utilizing smaller amounts of pseudoephedrine that has resulted in a boom in methamphetamine production in Oklahoma, the legislators announced.

According to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, the new recipe is responsible for a dramatic increase in meth lab seizures — from 213 labs in 2008 to 690 labs in 2009.

Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics data collected on customers attempting to purchase pseudoephedrine shows many of them have a criminal history involving methamphetamine offenses.

The proposed Oklahoma Methamphetamine Offender Registry will be tied to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics’ existing database used to track pseudoephedrine purchases.

The bill has the support of Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics officials.

“We must be strategic and surgical in our pursuit of the controls of pseudoephedrine,” commented Darrell Weaver, director of the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics. “There are many good citizens in Oklahoma who need it and should not be denied access. But there are illicit methamphetamine manufacturers in Oklahoma who will destroy themselves and everyone in their paths with clandestine laboratories.”

The legislation also has been endorsed by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, the trade association representing major U.S. manufacturers of nonprescription medicines.

In a letter provided to committee members, CHPA director of state government relations Mandy Hagan stated: “CHPA supports Oklahoma’s efforts to enhance enforcement of its progressive precursor control laws and continue to fight the illegal diversion of PSE [pseudoephedrine] for meth manufacture. HB 3380 provides an additional tool to law enforcement in that fight.”

Individuals who are not convicted of subsequent meth offenses within 10 years could then have their name removed from the registry. Any person who completes a deferred sentence prior to the 10-year time limitation could provide the state a certified copy of the dismissal of the case and also have his or her name removed.

Under the bill, any individual who assists a person on the registry in the purchase of any pseudoephedrine products could face one year in jail or a fine of up to $1,000, or both, on the first conviction. Subsequent convictions could result in a two-year prison sentence and fine of at least $2,500 or both.

House Bill 3380 was passed the House Public Safety Committee Wednesday. It now goes to the floor of the Oklahoma House of Representatives.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

CRN opens international headquarters

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON The Council for Responsible Nutrition on Tuesday announced the opening of its international headquarters in Manno, Switzerland. CRN will be opening a new wholly-owned entity to be known as the Council for Responsible Nutrition-International (CRN-I), the dietary supplement industry association announced.

“This was a natural progression for CRN to formalize the work it’s been doing for decades by standing up for science-based principles for dietary/food supplements worldwide,” stated Mark LeDoux, CRN. “CRN-I will provide a new forum by which we can strengthen our current efforts, with a particular emphasis on promoting sound nutrition and food safety policies, and encouraging government bodies, regulators and other decision makers to make policy recommendations that are well-grounded in science. In this global economy, having a European-based platform from which to disseminate science-based policy recommendations has been imperative to maximize our influence on behalf of our multi-national members doing business around the world.”

The new organization announced its immediate first priority is to conduct a one-day scientific symposium –“Scientific Issues Related to Codex Goals” — taking place July 3 in Geneva, Switzerland, in tandem with the Codex Alimentarius Commission meeting. The CRN-I conference will include invited international regulators and policy makers, nutrition scientists and academics, to share perspectives on Codex-related issues relating to risk management and scientific standards for health claims.

“We have a responsibility to our members and to our consumers worldwide to ensure that regulators and policy makers have the opportunity to engage in intellectual, peer-reviewed, science-based discussions so that they can consider these viewpoints as part of their policy-making process,” LeDoux said.

The CRN-I Board will be announced at the first CRN-I annual meeting, scheduled for April 15 in Paris in conjunction with the meeting of the Codex Committee on General Principles.

For more information, visit www.crn-i.ch.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

HEALTH

Shaking up protein times 6

BY DSN STAFF

ORLANDO, Fla. —BSN last month showcased its line of ready-to-drink protein supplements at the ECRM Vitamin, Diet & Sports Nutrition meeting here. The company’s RTD protein supplements already are best-sellers at specialty shop GNC and military retailer AAFES.

The new-to-mass RTD protein shake, called Syntha-6, features six proteins—including milk, whey and soy—that each are metabolized by the body at different rates, allowing for a more gradual supplementation of protein.

Sports enthusiasts and avid dieters may be credited with driving sales of protein supplements higher last year by some 22%; for the 52 weeks ended Dec. 26, 2009, sales of protein supplements reached $148.3 million across food, drug and mass (including Walmart), according to Nielsen Group data.

For 2010, BSN is planning $3.2 million in advertising.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES