HEALTH

Obesity leads children to take adult medications

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK Data from two pharmacy plans and a market-research company indicate that more and more children are taking prescription medication for illnesses related to obesity, according to The New York Times.

Data that the Times obtained from the market-research company Verispan and pharmacy plans Medco Health Solutions and Express Scripts show that hundreds of thousands of children are being prescribed drugs for Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, acid reflux and high cholesterol.

The Times also reported the American Academy of Pediatrics as recommending drugs to lower cholesterol for children as young as 8.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines obesity as a body mass index of 30 or greater and estimates that it affects 33.3 percent of adult men and 35.3 percent of adult women in the United States.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Red yeast rice, fish oil diet lowers cholesterol as well as drugs

BY Michael Johnsen

ROCHESTER, Minn. A study published in the July Mayo Clinic Proceedings determined that supplementation with red yeast rice and fish oil, combined with applicable lifestyle changes, were on par in lowering LDL levels as compared to taking a standard dose of simvastatin (Zocor).

In addition, the lifestyle modification arm of patients showed significant reductions in triglycerides and weight.

The authors noted, however, that one hurdle to this news may be the over-the-counter availability of red yeast rice. Manufacturers of red yeast rice supplements in the past have been requested by the Food and Drug Administration to reformulate products after determining the raw ingredients labeled as red yeast rice were in fact drugs and not supplements.

The randomized trial followed 74 patients with hypercholesterolemia, who were split either into an alternative treatment group or to receive 40 mg of simvastatin. The alternative treatment included therapeutic lifestyle changes, ingestion of red yeast rice, and fish oil supplements for 12 weeks. The simvastatin group received medication and traditional counseling. The primary outcome measure was the percentage change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Approximately 42.4 percent of the alternative group experienced a statistically significant reduction in LDL cholesterol levels, versus 39.6 percent in the simvastatin group. The alternative group experienced a 29 percent lowering in triglycerides, versus 9.3 percent, and a 5.5 percent loss of weight, versus 0.4 percent.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
HEALTH

Study suggests soy intake could affect male fertility

BY Michael Johnsen

CARY Soy intake could impact sperm count in men, a new study published in the journal Human Production on July 23 found.

Researchers at Harvard University followed the intake of 15 soy-based foods over three months in 99 male partners of subfertile couples and found that there was an inverse association between higher soy intake and lower sperm counts that remained significant after accounting for several potentially confounding factors, including age, abstinence, body mass index, and caffeine and alcohol consumption.

Men who consumed the most soy had 41 million sperm/ml less than men who consumed no soy, the researchers found.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?