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NutriGold launches fish oil PlantGels

BY David Salazar

NutriGold is bringing a vegan soft gel made of tapioca to the VMS aisle. The Orem, Utah-based company has introduced its omega-3 fish oil in its Non-GMO Project-verified PlantGel capsules, which NutriGold officials said was part of its efforts to create an alternative to soft gels made with carrageenan, bovine, porcine or fish-based gelatin.

“Our success with PlantGels is the culmination of previously unsuccessful attempts to replace animal-sourced gelatin in our omega-3 products with a plant-based alternative that is not only safer than carrageenan but also meets our exacting purity and safety standards,” NutriGold founder and COO Osman Khan said.

The company said that the PlantGel offering also is pesco-vegetarian friendly and halal, as well as Marine Stewardship Council Certified Sustainable. The omega-3 fish oil is made from wild Alaskan Pollack, and the company noted that the product is sourced, processed and manufactured in the United States. 

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3 traps to avoid in presentations

BY Dan Mack

Blais Pascal famously wrote, “I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time.” Like Pascal,most salespeople have an inability to keep to the point. My research shows that over 75% of all customer presentations are too long, disjointed, irrelevant or are simply boring. A national retail executive once shared with me: “Most sales presentation put me to sleep or create a trance-like state. They rarely capture my attention.” Do you want to be perceived as valuable and distinct? Get to the point.

A few years ago, Microsoft uncovered that the average attention span has fallen 33%, from 12 seconds to eight seconds. We now live in a world where capturing one’s attention is an invaluable art form. The clear majority of people are still stuck in “PowerPoint thinking,” a regimented and overblown approach to communication. But the best communicators are true, concise, and flexible. Are you able to get to the point and hold another’s attention? Research proves you may not be as good as you think.

On average, people spend 60% of conversations talking about themselves. Those people are lost at sea and don’t even know it. I have discovered three big communication traps:

1.Embellishment
Brilliant writers share one thing: extreme editing. They unapologetically and mercilessly cut any unnecessary elements. Communications must remain minimal, clear, and thoughtful. While most of us aren’t routinely exposed to merciless editors, if you ever get to see their process you’ll realize there is always an opportunity to cut. Trim the fat from your discussions – learn brevity.

2. Unreadiness
Want to be irrelevant? Don’t prepare properly. Under-promising and over-performing is the most proven, yet least practiced, adage today. There is nothing worse than someone who shows up for a discussion and doesn’t understand your needs, agenda, or communication preference. The best communicators think like surgeons, diagnosing the situation (and context) before they prescribe a solution.

3. Isolation
Stretching is inherently uncomfortable. To be present and receptive in a room full of people is an incredibly difficult feat. The best communicators are in the moment with you, adapting their communication style to be congruent with yours, no matter if you’re alone or with a whole team. It’s not about them, it’s about you. In a word, they are highly present.
Mark Twain wrote, “It usually takes me two or three days to prepare an impromptu speech.” The best presentations (or discussions) have no fluff. They have been edited down to the essence of the message. Keep the tangents to the dinner table with old friends. Anyone can give a 30-slide presentation; very few can share an idea with precision in one slide. The more concise the presentation, the more time necessary to create it.

Rather than falling into the three traps, ask yourself three questions:

  1. Is your communication simple, clear, and direct?
  2. Is it natural, conversational, and relatable?
  3. Can you grab someone’s attention and still make your point is less than 60 seconds?

A long, monotonous presentation is a crutch and is distracting and ineffective. Don’t talk just fill up others time with words. Learn to pause, reflect, and listen. In other words, quit making so much noise and listen more.

One must create a compelling sales story that is simple, experiential, and unique while capturing another’s attention.  Don’t let needless details detract from your message. Uncover the soul of your message.



Dan Mack is a strategist, advisor and coach to numerous companies; the founder of the Elevation Forum leadership group, and co-founder of the New General Market Summit providing insight to many of today’s top growth companies.  His first book is  “Dark Horse: How Challenger Companies Rise to Prominence.”

 

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Rite Aid announces senior management changes across category management

BY Michael Johnsen

Camp Hill, Pa.-based Rite Aid on Friday named Bill Renz senior vice president category management, from his current role as group vice president of consumables and photo, in the wake of retirement announcements from Tony Montini, executive vice president of merchandising and distribution, and Bill Bergin, group vice president of health and beauty.

“Bill has worked in nearly every category of the retail drugstore industry and has a tremendous ability to identify front-end items and product assortments that truly resonate with our valued customers,” stated Bryan Everett, COO Rite Aid stores. “Leveraging his extensive experience and deep knowledge of our business, we will continue to transform our front-end offering and deliver an outstanding Rite Aid experience.”

Other changes include Ted Williams, Rite Aid’s current vice president of general merchandise and seasonal, has been named group vice president of consumables, general merchandise and seasonal. Bryan Shirtliff, who currently leads the company’s merchandising efforts, has been named group vice president of health and beauty. And Nate Newcomer, Rite Aid’s current vice president of category management support and front-end analysis, has been named group vice president of category management administration, financial analysis and replenishment.

Williams, Shirtliff and Newcomer all will report to Renz.

“These changes position Rite Aid for the future and support our efforts to deliver an outstanding experience in our stores,” said Everett. “Ted, Bryan and Nate have played a key role in the success of our company and we look forward to benefitting from their expertise and knowledge in their new roles as we work to continue meeting the health and wellness needs of our customers and patients.”

Renz joined Rite Aid in 1998 as director of general merchandise and photo. He was promoted to vice president of general merchandise in 2000 and named to his current role in 2014. Before joining Rite Aid, Renz held various category management positions at Gray Drug-Fair, Sherwin Williams, Circuit City and Office Max. He will report to Everett.

With the changes, two of the architects who have helped shape Rite Aid’s cutting-edge store format have announced their retirement. Montini has served in his current role since 2011, after returning to the company in 2010 as senior vice president of category management. He also served as senior vice president of category management from 2002 through 2003 and as vice president of purchasing from 1987 through 1989.

Bergin joined Rite Aid in 1999 and was named to his current role in 2009.

“Tony has built a strong culture of speed, innovation and collaboration across his team that has driven positive results. Bill has also played a key role in the success of our company, both through his strong leadership and successful merchandising innovations that make many of our key health and beauty categories much easier to shop,” Everett said. “We appreciate Tony and Bill’s many outstanding contributions to Rite Aid over their nearly 30 years of combined service, and wish them well with their future plans.”

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