HEALTH

Nutramax launches comprehensive line of supplements for the family dog

BY Michael Johnsen

LANCASTER, S.C. — Nutramax Laboratories on Wednesday announced the nationwide launch of Cosequin for Dogs into Walmart stores. Cosequin is formulated to support, nourish and maintain the health of canine joints and cartilage. Included in the product launch is Dermaquin Plus, an omega-3 fish oil supplement for dogs supporting skin and coat health plus overall wellness.

The line is being endorsed by “Jungle Jack Hanna”, director emeritus of the Columbus Zoo, the Cosequin brand spokesperson for the past two years. “[My dog] is a normal aging yellow labrador and Cosequin helps keep her moving,” Hanna said. “I don’t endorse many products, but I am pleased to support Cosequin and Nutramax Laboratories.”

“We are happy to work with Walmart to provide their customers with joint health support options for their four-legged family members,” stated Robert Devlin, Nutramax senior director of veterinary science division. “Pets play such an important part of our lives providing us with joy and comfort. Nutramax Laboratories wants to help keep them moving and comfortable with Cosequin.”

Cosequin for Dogs will be available in three convenient formulations — Cosequin Standard Strength, Cosequin Advanced Strength Joint Support with added Multi-Vitamins and Cosequin DS Plus MSM Maximum Strength Joint Health Support.

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HEALTH

Drug store channel of choice for OTC buyers

BY DSN STAFF

The majority of OTC purchases are made in chain drug, according to an online survey of more than 900 AccentHealth viewers conducted in September. No fewer than 47% of AccentHealth viewers make their purchases there, followed by mass outlets (33%) and grocery stores (12%). Less than 3% seek out OTC products in the dollar store, local drug store and club store, respectively. And only 1% make that OTC purchase online.

To see more Patient Views, click here.

Patient Views is a new, exclusive consumer insights feature that appears in every edition of DSN magazine, as well as the daily e-newsletter DSN A.M. If you could ask 4,000 patients anything at all, what would it be? Send your questions to [email protected].

Source: AccentHealth. To view the demographic breakdown of participants, click here.

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HEALTH

Research review: Vitamin D may prevent tooth decay

BY Michael Johnsen

SEATTLE — A new review of existing studies points toward a potential role for vitamin D in helping to prevent dental caries, or tooth decay. The review, published in the December issue of Nutrition Reviews, encompassed 24 controlled clinical trials, spanning the 1920s to the 1980s, on approximately 3,000 children in several countries. These trials showed that vitamin D was associated with an approximately 50% reduction in the incidence of tooth decay, the University of Washington announced Tuesday. 

"My main goal was to summarize the clinical trial database so that we could take a fresh look at this vitamin D question," stated Philippe Hujoel of the University of Washington, who conducted the review.

While vitamin D’s role in supporting bone health has not been disputed, significant disagreement has historically existed over its role in preventing caries, Hujoel noted. The American Medical Association and the U.S. National Research Council concluded around 1950 that vitamin D was beneficial in managing dental caries. The American Dental Association said otherwise – based on the same evidence. In 1989, the National Research Council, despite new evidence supporting vitamin D’s caries-fighting benefits, called the issue "unresolved."

Current reviews by the Institute of Medicine, the U.S. Department of Human Health and Service and the American Dental Association draw no conclusions on the vitamin D evidence as it relates to dental caries.

"Such inconsistent conclusions by different organizations do not make much sense from an evidence-based perspective," Hujoel said. The trials he reviewed increased vitamin D levels in children through the use of supplemental UV radiation or by supplementing the children’s diet with cod-liver oil or other products containing the vitamin.

Hujoel added a note of caution to his findings: "One has to be careful with the interpretation of this systematic review. The trials had weaknesses which could have biased the result, and most of the trial participants lived in an era that differs profoundly from today’s environment. "

 

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