BEAUTY CARE

Nourish by Sensible Organics names actress Christine Taylor as celebrity ambassador

BY Antoinette Alexander

BEAVER FALLS, Pa. — Nourish by Sensible Organics, an organic beauty and personal care brand that launches this month exclusively at Whole Foods Market nationwide, has signed actress Christine Taylor to be its national brand ambassador.

In her new role as brand ambassador, she will be the face of the beauty brand and its products, and will help raise awareness about the numerous health and beauty benefits of using 100% USDA-certified organic personal care products.

Taylor may be best known for her starring roles in such films as "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story," "The Wedding Singer," "The Brady Bunch Movie" and "Zoolander.”

"Christine Taylor is an ideal choice to represent the Nourish brand as our ambassador. She is authentic in her beliefs of living a greener, healthier lifestyle; and as a busy mother of two young children, Christine can speak to her own personal journey of integrating better beauty, health and wellness solutions into her family’s lifestyle," stated Rick Ruffolo, CEO and president of Sensible Organics.

The Nourish line includes organic body wash, organic hand wash, organic body lotion, organic body butter, organic deodorant and organic exfoliating body polish. All of the products display the USDA-certified seal.

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FDA delays new rules for sunscreen makers

BY Antoinette Alexander

WASHINGTON  — Manufacturers of sunscreen now will have six additional months to meet the new labeling and testing requirements as imposed by the Food and Drug Administration, according to an announcement from the Federal Register.

The FDA ordered the changes last summer but gave manufacturers one year — until this June — to get the revised bottles on the shelf.

The FDA now is delaying the compliance dates of the 2011 final rule by six months, to Dec. 17, 2012, for products with sales of $25,000 or more, and until Dec. 17, 2013, for products with annual sales of less than $25,000.

“The 2011 final rule requirements are intended to ensure that [over-the-counter] sunscreen products are used safely and effectively. Therefore, allowing adequate time for the 2011 final rule requirements to be fully implemented is in the interest of public health. Our reassessment of the time needed for full implementation of the 2011 final rule requirements supports delaying the compliance dates by six months,” according to the announcement from the Federal Register.

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Visual cues, comparison shopping can sway shoppers to switch brands, research finds

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK — New research that will appear in the upcoming issue of the Journal of Marketing Research explores consumer sentiment over the extension of a premium brand outside of its typical category.

In their paper, "The Importance of the Context in Brand Extension: How Pictures and Comparisons Shift Consumers’ Focus from Fit to Quality," professors Tom Meyvis of the NYU Stern School of Business, Kelly Goldsmith of the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and Ravi Dhar of the Yale School of Management, found that consumers were more willing to switch their preference from a "low-status brand" (e.g., Kmart camping gear) to an extension of a premium brand that isn’t a natural fit for the product category (e.g., Speedo camping gear) when marketers add a picture of the product in question or allow consumers to compare brands rather than judge each brand separately.

"New brand extensions are often tested in an abstract setting (e.g., what would you think of a Crest facial moisturizer?)," Meyvis said. "In this market research context, consumers place too much emphasis on the fit between the brand and the product. As a result, companies may underestimate the value and opportunity of high-status brands extending into a wide variety of product categories."

Additional findings included:

  • Visual cues (e.g., pictures of the product), shift consumers’ focus to the quality of the parent brand and away from the fit of the brand when evaluating a brand’s new product offering;

  • Brand comparisons shift consumers’ preference from lower status brands (e.g., ShopRite cottage cheese) toward higher status brands even if they aren’t a good fit (e.g., Haagen-Dazs cottage cheese); and

  • Market research studies that mimic a typical shopping environment with visual information and competing brands will reveal greater potential for high-status brand extensions

"A high-quality brand that is introducing a product in a category that isn’t a good fit would benefit from marketing efforts that encourage brand comparisons," Goldsmith said. "Conversely, a lower-quality brand that is introducing a new extension may benefit from shopping environments where the product is not being compared to other brands (e.g., by placing it in an end-of-aisle display)."

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