HEALTH

No. 1 Flonase to face strong competition

BY Michael Johnsen

The allergy space will continue to heat up significantly in 2017 as marketers pollinate the airwaves with advertisements promoting their latest brand introductions. GSK Consumer Healthcare will have its hands full defending the Flonase franchise, now the No. 1 allergy remedy on the market. Not only is there another nasal corticosteroid on the market — McNeil Consumer’s Rhinocort launched earlier this year — but Flonase faces increasing private-label and brand competition.

(To view the full ECRM Report, click here.)

Bayer recently brought ClariSpray to market, which features a fluticasone propionate active, trading on its Claritin heritage and adding yet another nasal corticosteroid to the mix.

But GSK Consumer Healthcare already has a Flonase line extension in the works. The Food and Drug Administration earlier this year approved Flonase Sensimist Allergy Relief (fluticasone furoate, 27.5 mcg spray), previously available as prescription-only Veramyst, as an over-the-counter treatment for symptoms associated with seasonal and perennial allergies. Flonase Sensimist will be available OTC in early 2017.

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Nielsen: Consumers with diabetes spend 35% more on OTC products

BY Michael Johnsen

Consumers with diabetes spend 35% more on OTC products than the average consumer, noted Jeff Gregori, group VP consumer and shopper analytics for Nielsen, during a recent presentation at the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Total Store Expo. “That’s hands down more than any other ailment,” he said, and it’s because they face so many challenges beyond their initial diagnosis.

(To view the full ECRM Report, click here.)

For example, according to the 2015 Nielsen Diabetes Survey, 63% of diabetics who received their diagnosis within the past two years struggle with weight control, and 40% find staying fit or in shape challenging. And that doesn’t get much better after time, Gregori noted, because as many as 60% of diabetics who had been diagnosed more than 5 years ago still struggle with weight control, and 39% with staying fit or in shape.

“There is a real logical connection between that 35% that the overall diabetic spends on OTC,” Gregori said. “The reason for that is they’re struggling. They are struggling in the beginning, and [the OTC spend] is a consequence of that struggle.”

All told, sales of product with a diabetes-specific focus increased 5.1% in 2015, Nielsen reported, reaching $592 million in total sales.

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Study: Nasal saline may prove effective in treating chronic nosebleeds

BY Michael Johnsen

SALT LAKE CITY – Squirting a simple saline solution into the nose twice a day could alleviate chronic nosebleeds just as effectively as spraying with any one of three different medications, according to a study published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association on Sept. 6.

"This research highlights that there could be a benefit even in the simplest of interventions," stated corresponding author Kevin Whitehead, associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Utah School of Medicine and director of the Utah HHT Clinical Center. "No drug proved to be any better than the saline placebo, but the majority of patients improved over the course of treatment – even those using saline."

While nosebleeds are an occasional nuisance for most consumers, they are an unpleasant fact of life for those with hemorrhagic telangiectasia. One bloody nose per week is not uncommon, and some with the condition have more than two a day. Doctors have tried prescribing drugs off-label to treat what can be a debilitating problem, but with mixed results. The NOSE (North American Study of Epistaxis in HHT) phase 2 clinical trial was designed to determine how three of these medications – bevacizumab, estriol and tranexamic acid – stacked up against one another.

As many as 121 study participants were randomly assigned one of the drugs, or a saline placebo, to spray into their nose twice a day during a 12-week treatment period. Each day they logged how many bloody noses they had, how long they lasted and checked the boxes next to descriptions that matched their symptoms, such as whether their nosebleeds were "typically gushing or pouring." Both at the beginning and end of the treatment period, participants received a composite score between 0-10 based on their answers (10 being the most severe), a routine method for assessing severity.

The majority of participants' severity scores dropped, and by nearly identical amounts, from between 5-6 to between 3-4. A significant improvement, Whitehead said. Participants reported a positive change regardless of which drug they used, or whether they misted their nose with placebo.

"The results suggest that medicines that people all over the world have used appear to have no benefit over plain saline," stated study collaborator James Gossage, director of the Pulmonary Vascular Disease Program at Augusta University.

The idea that simple hydration from any nasal spray, even saline, could prevent nosebleeds certainly makes sense, Whitehead said. People are at higher risk for nosebleeds when their nose dries out, for instance when they're in an arid climate for extended periods of time.

Yet the investigators cannot completely rule out the possibility that symptoms may have improved because of a placebo effect: that participants reported better outcomes because they expected to see an improvement. What's more, it could be that some of the drugs would work better if taken at a higher dose, or if applied as a gel or polymer that adheres better to the inside of the nasal cavity.

Nevertheless, the results from this clinical trial were enough to convince Whitehead, Gossage and their colleagues, to routinely recommend saline nasal spray to their patients with HHT. "We stress the importance of hydration,"  Whitehead said. "We tell them that something as simple as a morning and night saline spray could offer them some benefit."

Nosebleeds caused by HHT are not fundamentally different from common nosebleeds, but scientists have yet to test whether saline could work just as well for anyone.

"There are no data for extrapolating these results to patients with nosebleeds who don't have HHT," Gossage said. "But certainly it's an easy thing to try."
 

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