HEALTH

Nicotine gum helps pregnant women decrease amount of smoking, research says

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON Although nicotine gum does not necessarily increase quit rates among pregnant women, the non-prescription smoking cessation product does help reduce the amount of smoking to the point that use of nicotine gum increased birth weight and gestational age, two key parameters in predicting neonatal wellbeing, new research published last week in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology has found.

The study tracked pregnant women who smoked daily and received individualized behavioral counseling and random assignment to a 6-week treatment with 2-mg nicotine gum or placebo followed by a 6-week taper period. Women who did not quit smoking were instructed to reduce the number of cigarettes smoked by substituting with gum.

Using a completer analysis, nicotine gum significantly reduced the number of cigarettes smoked per day and cotinine concentration. Birth weights were significantly greater with nicotine gum compared with placebo. Gestational age was also greater with nicotine-replacement therapy than with placebo, the research found.

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SnoreStop launches updated line of natural anti-snoring remedies

BY Michael Johnsen

CAMARILLO, Calif. SnoreStop is introducing a new look for its line of natural anti-snoring medicine that feature three delivery systems—a throat spray, chewable tablets and a nasal spray.

The contemporary see-through packaging is environmentally friendly, the company reported.

Television spots featuring the new packaging will be placed against several nationally televised programs this winter, including CNN, Divorce Court, Inside Edition, Jeopardy and Live with Regis and Kelly.

Suggested retail price for each of the three SKUs is $12.99.

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Vitamin C may impact efficacy of certain cancer drugs, journal says

BY Michael Johnsen

PHILADELPHIA Vitamin C may interfere with the efficacy of several cancer drugs in mice, the journal Cancer Research reported Wednesday, including doxorubicin, cisplatin, vincristine, methotrexate and imatinib.

“These results support the hypothesis that vitamin C supplementation during cancer treatment may detrimentally affect therapeutic response,” the authors concluded.

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