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NFL Players Association licenses TheraPearl hot/cold packs

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The NFL Players Association last week announced a new licensing relationship with TheraPearl, a consumer products company specializing in hot and cold pack technology. TheraPearl’s products are designed to aid in post-workout recovery.

“Our products maximize targeted hot and cold therapy, and are uniquely designed for athletes and athlete recovery," stated Daniel Baumwald, president of TheraPearl.

TheraPearl’s products recently were on display at the 2012 NFLPA Rookie Premiere in Los Angeles last month, where 35 NFL rookies tried TheraPearl.

“Health and safety is a great concern for all professional football players,” stated Keith Gordon, president of NFL Players. “We are pleased to take on an innovative company like TheraPearl as an official licensee. Proper recovery between practice and games is a crucial piece of staying healthy, and TheraPearl technology aims to enhance and maximize the recovery process. We hope that both players and fans will embrace their products.”

TheraPearl products include various shape and size packs that can be chilled or heated to provide targeted therapy, and specialty athletic recovery products that include adjustable shin, shoulder and knee wraps. The packs easily conform to the body when frozen. When heated, the conformable packs help stimulate blood flow while relaxing stiff muscles.

 


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Meijer joins EPA GreenChill Partnership

BY DSN STAFF

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Meijer recently joined the U.S. Environment Protection Agency’s GreenChill Partnership. Created as a voluntary partnership, GreenChill members focus on reducing refrigerant emissions and decreasing their impact on the environment and ultimately people’s health. By joining GreenChill, Meijer is pledging to meet higher standards that go beyond the regulatory requirements to protect the ozone layer and combat climate change.

According to GreenChill, partners have refrigerant emission rates that are nearly 50% lower than the national average; if more supermarkets and supercenters set-forth similar procedures, the industry could save more than $100 million in refrigerant costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an amount equal to 2.5 billion gallons of gasoline.

In addition to joining the GreenChill partnership, Meijer also has embarked on several additional environmentally-friendly initiatives, including fuel centers that offer such alternative fuel choices as E-85 Flex Fuel, clean diesel and electric vehicle charging stations. Meijer also is building all new stores using LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program guidelines and principles, and is testing wind turbines at several locations with the understanding that tapping wind as a renewable power source can make a difference in reducing a total carbon footprint.

"We’re very committed to positive environmental care through our many corporate actions and decisions," said Julie Croll, SVP properties, real estate and procurement for Meijer. "This pledge demonstrates Meijer’s ongoing effort to provide our customers with more than just a great shopping experience, it gives them the peace of mind that we are doing everything we can to keep them and their families healthy and the environment protected."

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Researchers note link between diabetes, cognitive decline

BY Allison Cerra

CHICAGO — Diabetes and poor glucose control may be associated with greater cognitive decline in older adults, according to a new report from Archives of Neurology, a JAMA Network publication.

Previous studies have suggested a link between diabetes and an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, researchers, led by Kristine Yaffe of the University of California in San Francisco and the San Francisco VA Medical Center, analyzed 3,069 patients who completed the modified mini-mental state examination and digit symbol substitution test at baseline and selected intervals over 10 years. At study baseline, 717 patients (23.4%) had prevalent diabetes and 2,352 (76.6%) did not have diabetes, 159 of whom developed diabetes during follow-up. Patients who had prevalent diabetes at baseline had lower 3MS and DSST test scores than patients without diabetes. Results from the analysis showed similar patterns for a 9-year decline among participants with prevalent diabetes (that demonstrated significant decline on both the 3MS and DSST), compared with those without diabetes.

Additional details of the study can be found here.

"This study supports the hypothesis that older adults with [diabetes] have reduced cognitive function and that poor glycemic control may contribute to this association," the authors concluded. "Future studies should determine if early diagnosis and treatment of [diabetes] lessen the risk of developing cognitive impairment and if maintaining optimal glucose control helps mitigate the effect of [diabetes] on cognition."


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Dec-05-2013 01:57 am

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