BEAUTY CARE

Newell Rubbermaid CEO to retire

BY Antoinette Alexander

ATLANTA — Newell Rubbermaid, whose portfolio includes the hair accessories brand Goody, has announced that its president and CEO, Mark Ketchum, will retire later this year.

An executive recruiting firm has been retained to conduct an outside search for Ketchum’s replacement and also to assist with the assessment of internal candidates, the company stated. To help ensure a smooth and transition, Ketchum plans to remain on the company¹s board through the spring of 2012.

Ketchum joined Newell Rubbermaid as a director in 2005 and became president and CEO later that year. "I am extremely proud of what we have accomplished over the past five years at Newell Rubbermaid. I love this company and the people I work with, making my decision to retire extremely difficult, but consistent with the commitments I made to my family when I joined the company," stated Ketchum. "As the result of a lot of hard work and effort by everyone in the organization, our portfolio, our gross margin structure and our business model has been significantly transformed. We managed through the most difficult economic times in decades and have emerged a leaner, stronger organization focused on the key elements [that] will drive our continuing improvement."

Added Michael Cowhig, chairman of the board, "Mark Ketchum’s leadership, especially during the difficult economic times and through the many elements of our transformation initiatives, has positioned the company to compete effectively in the extremely dynamic markets in which we participate. Mark’s relentless focus on understanding and serving the needs of our consumers, together with the creation of stronger strategic relationships with our retail and commercial partners have made Newell Rubbermaid the transformed company it is today — a new Newell Rubbermaid [that] remains poised for strong growth in the years to come."

"Although our board of directors and associates would have loved Mark to remain our CEO for several more years, we fully respect the commitment he made to his family, and appreciate the fact that he has chosen to retire at a time when the company has completed most of its transformation efforts and is positioned for continued success," Cowhig added.

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Finesse gets Clean + Simple

BY Antoinette Alexander

STAMFORD, Conn. — Lornamead is bringing new innovation to hair care with its new Finesse Clean + Simple line, the first dermatologist-tested hypoallergenic shampoo and conditioner developed for the mass market.

“Up until now, people with sensitive skin or allergies had to settle for expensive specialty or salon products to meet their needs. Now, they have a good, affordable option for the whole family where they usually shop for shampoo,” stated Randy Sloan, president of Lornamead, which acquired the brand from Unilever in 2006.

According to Lornamead, nearly 60% of women reported that they were concerned about allergens and harsh chemicals in products that touch their skin. People with these concerns tended to avoid such common allergens as dyes, sulfates and irritating fragrances. Finesse Clean + Simple is free of sulfates, parabens, gluten and dyes.

Furthermore, a 2008 study from the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Brest, France, found that 44.2% of the 1,011 respondents declared suffering from a “sensitive scalp” (47.4% of women versus 40.8% of men). Of those subjects, 11.5% reported having an associated scalp disease versus 1.1% of nonsensitive subjects. Hair loss significantly was associated with scalp sensitivity. The scalp was dry for 24%, normal for 58%, greasy for 16% and mixed for 1% of respondents. Meanwhile, 13% complained of prickling, 25% of itching and 2% of burning or pain. These symptoms were more frequent among those with a “sensitive scalp.” The main triggering factors were considered to be shampoos, pollution, heat and emotions.

To help those consumers with sensitive skin or allergies, the new Finesse Clean + Simple products have an extra gentle surfactant to cleanse hair without scalp irritation or excessive drying; a light fragrance that is certified hypoallergenic; a specially selected conditioning agent that promises to leave hair soft and shiny without build up and an advanced hairspray resin in a low alcohol hairspray formula.

The collection includes Clean + Simple shampoo for normal hair, Clean + Simple conditioner for normal hair, Clean + Simple shampoo for dry/color treated hair, Clean + Simple conditioner for dry/color treated hair and Clean + Simple flexible hold hairspray. The line started to ship at the end of December and currently is in Walgreens.

Finesse, which launched in 1982, now has a product portfolio that includes Finesse Self Adjusting Formulas, Finesse ReVitality for aging hair and the new Finesse Clean + Simple line.

According to SymphonyIRI Group, for the 12 weeks ended Oct. 31, 2010, at food, drug and mass (excluding Walmart), sales of shampoo rose 2.41% to $314.8 million, and sales of conditioners rose 1.4% to $208.7 million.

Finesse Clean + Simple will be available at retailers nationwide at a price of $2.99 to $3.99.

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Most women defy dressing their age, research finds

BY Antoinette Alexander

LONDON — Image-conscious women don’t "dress their age" until they reach 70 years old, according to new research carried out by the retailer Debenhams, a department store group that has a strong presence in such categories as women’s clothing, shoes, children’s wear and beauty.

The research found that a majority of women (89%) aspire to dress younger than their years, with 55% citing 70 years as the age they felt would be appropriate, or had been the age they were happy to dress their age. However, 45% of women said that their 70s would be no barrier to dressing and looking younger.

"You only have to look at celebrity examples like Elle Macpherson and Sophia Loren to see that women are looking younger than ever," stated Debenhams representative Carie Barkhuizen. "So it’s no surprise that our customers are also dressing for how they feel, rather than what it says on their drivers’ licenses — and we want to encourage them."

The research also found that it is not always about looking younger. More than 70% of women said they styled themselves to look older in their teens to impress boys or get into bars. Women in their 20s also emerged as a decade for dressing older, with nearly 80% of women giving career progression as the reason.

Most women agreed that their 30s and 40s were torn between dressing frumpier when adjusting to the demands of babies and small children and a growing concern with looking younger. More than 50% of women said they started to dress younger in their 30s, and 90% admitted that they had started to dress younger by their mid-40s.

The top five items suggested by shoppers for feeling and looking younger: well-fitted, supportive underwear, such as shapewear; trendy accessories; high heels; fitted jackets and contemporary makeup.

Meanwhile, only 12% of men said they had ever thought about dressing to look younger.

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