News

New programs spell loyalty with silent ‘you’

BY Alaric DeArment

In 2006, Time magazine added a twist to its annual “Person of the Year” cover story, replacing the usual picture of some prominent individual with a picture of a glossy computer screen to show that social networking had made “you” the person of the year. Now, the idea that it’s all about “you” has percolated into retail. 


It appears that 2012 has become the year of the loyalty card. And while loyalty cards are nothing new in this industry — CVS introduced ExtraCare in 2001 — there appears to be a growing interest among retailers eager to understand how their best shoppers use their stores, what they buy and how often, and how to use that information to get them to shop more often and spend more when they do.


Rite Aid’s Wellness+ program has been a lifesaver for the Camp Hill, Pa.-based chain, with its 52 million members consistently showing greater basket rings than nonmembers. ExtraCare now boasts more than 69 million members, with about 67% of all transactions coming through the program — and importantly, according to company research, ExtraCare members buy 85% more items per trip than nonmembers. 


“While pharmacy retailers have a tremendous understanding of their customer’s Rx regimen, many are realizing the value of understanding their customers’ front-end purchase behavior as it relates to their total health and wellness,” Catalina Marketing SVP brand development Sharon Glass told Drug Store News. “There is also increased competitive pressure in the market to capture more of a consumer’s trips.”


Safeway in July made its Just For U program available across all divisions. “Registration is on track,” Steve Burd, Safeway chairman and CEO, told analysts during a July 19 conference call. So far, Safeway has managed to enroll about 70% of its customers into the program in markets where it has been available. “The conversion to regular use is running 20% greater to what we initially anticipated,” Burd said. “The incremental spend for that casual user is more than 50% more than anticipated.”


Safeway expects 35% of its business will come from Just for U members this year, growing to 65% to 70% over the next three years. Just for U includes a mobile app that significantly enhances participation, Burd said, with the program’s mobile users engaging 50% more often than desktop users.


Burd told analysts he expects more of his competitors will launch programs of their own in the months ahead. One of them will be Walgreens, as anticipation continues to build in advance of the launch of its program, expected sometime this fall. While it has been in the works long before the June announcement of the Alliance Boots deal, the Walgreens program will benefit from the learnings of Boots’ loyalty program, the largest in the United Kingdom. 


So why are retailers suddenly embracing the programs? Again, it’s all about “you.” “They’re enabling shoppers to interact with retailers on a more personal level, in a sense that they receive communications from a retailer based on their shopping and buying behavior,” Nielsen SVP consumer and shopper insights Todd Hale told DSN. Retailers can use the data they collect to create segments, such as top spenders versus light spenders and people who spend on different categories of products, engaging customers in a “micro” fashion.


It also creates the potential for personalized pricing, as Safeway’s program is doing. This, Kantar Retail chief knowledge officer Bryan Gildenberg told DSN, can help curb competitors who might try to one-up a retailer on pricing by looking at the prices on the shelves. “Over the next few years, more of the best shoppers at the retailers … that have loyalty cards will be getting a menu of prices that are outside the public domain, and that pricing may become a private conversation between retailers and their best shoppers,” Gildenberg said. 


But it’s not just about “price messaging,” Gildenberg explained. “There’s a whole host of personalized marketing that you can do. You can communicate to shoppers around particular seasons; you can remind shoppers that they bought 90 days worth of vitamins 89 days ago, and they’re about to run out.”


Notwithstanding possible concerns about privacy, Gildenberg said that pharmacy retailers also could create special opt-in programs for customers with special health needs, like diabetics. Last September, Rite Aid rolled out the first major expansion of its Wellness+ program, Wellness+ for Diabetes.


Loyalty programs aren’t limited to just the big chains. Pharmaca Integrative Pharmacy, the Boulder, Colo.-based chain that operates 24 stores in the West, has found success with its Feel Better Rewards program, including a 50% increase in the percentage of customers cross-shopping between pharmacy and the rest of the store and an increase of 10% to 15% in per-member spending. Pharmaca president and CEO Mark Panzer attributes this to its ability to approach on a customer-by-customer basis instead of simply putting out a circular that tries to grab for anyone the chain can. “It allows you to be more micro than macro in your approach to setting marketing goals,” Panzer told DSN.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

New DR store ‘ups’ up market

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK — Duane Reade has further developed its leading edge “up market” store concept with the recent opening of its second flagship store in Manhattan’s Financial District. Located in the stately American Surety building at 100 Broadway, the 22,000-sq.-ft. store fits the rich history of the area while incorporating some of the most innovative ideas seen today in retail pharmacy.


This impressive location, which features a Walgreens bridge pharmacy — now in all 253 Duane Reade stores — caters to a mix of local workers and tourists. While the store may not feature many of the beauty-oriented services offered at 40 Wall St., it does offer several new additions in food, including a gourmet salad bar, full-time coffee barista and self-serve hot soups. The store also hosts a museum-like exhibit that pays homage to the many victory parades that have passed before it through Manhattan’s historic “Canyon of Heroes” section of lower Broadway.

Click here for part 1 of the photos.

Click here for part 2 of the photos.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

Clampdown on the Rx gray market: Striking a balance amid drug shortages

BY Jim Frederick

How can Congress plug the leaks in the pharmaceutical supply chain and dry up the stream of gray market drugs without making the current drug shortage even worse? And can federal regulators shut down gray market profiteers without limiting “the ability of pharmacies to take care of their patients?”

That was the challenge posed by John Coster, SVP government affairs for the National Community Pharmacists Association, in testimony on July 25 before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. The NCPA, like other pharmacy groups, supports a federal clampdown on unscrupulous "shell pharmacies … that seem to have been established for the sole purpose of buying medications in short supply from primary wholesalers in order to sell them to seemingly unethical secondary wholesalers," in Coster’s words. But he urged Congress not to apply a regulatory sledge hammer to the problem.

"Pharmacies should … be allowed to continue selling pharmaceutical products to other pharmacies, because it helps to alleviate temporary shortages, especially in rural areas where daily wholesaler deliveries may be more sporadic," Coster told the committee. And pharmacies serving every channel, including community drug stores and hospitals, should be free to use secondary wholesalers "as alternatives to ensure their inventory remains properly stocked," he warned.

Coster noted that the prescription drug shortages plaguing the nation’s health system "have been most acute at hospitals with relation to injectable and infusion drugs." The gray market purveyors skillfully are playing into those shortages, and in some cases, are holding hospitals hostage by exploiting their devotion to their primary mission: To put patients’ wellbeing and treatment priorities above all other considerations.

"Even within a budget, patient care trumps budgets," one pharmacy administrator for a hospital group in the upper Midwest told me. Another pharmacy manager at the same health system told me that the direct costs of having to use alternate suppliers for some scarce medicines range from $25,000 to $50,000 or more a month.

Another hospital pharmacy leader for a health system on the West Coast told me that the shortage has made gray market suppliers "very tempting because of clinical needs," but adds that she avoids that alternative supply channel. What stops her, she said, are concerns over a gray market drug’s pedigree and the fact that those products are sometimes "five times more than we normally pay."

The drug supply crunch is particularly serious for sterile injectables and infused medicines in such treatment areas as "pain medication, anesthesia, cancer care, emergency care — all the drugs related to surgeries," said Roslyne Schulman, director of policy for the American Hospital Association. The AHA polled more than 800 hospitals last year and found that virtually all of them were affected by one or more drug shortages in the first half of 2011, and that 82% of hospitals had “delayed patient treatment as a result of a drug shortage.” Schulman called that finding “stunning” and “record-breaking.”

What’s more, "The vast majority of all types of hospitals reported increased drug costs as a result of drug shortages," AHA reports, as they’ve resorted to buying more expensive alternative drugs from secondary sources.

As Drug Store News senior editor Mike Johnsen reports, the sellers can jack up the prices of drugs in critically short supply, sometimes by many multiples of their original price. And hospital pharmacy buyers sometimes feel they have little choice but to pay the exorbitant costs to get critically needed meds to their patients.

If you’re a hospital pharmacist trying to cope with the drug shortage, I’d like to hear from you. Have you had to routinely turn to secondary or even gray-market sources to plug the holes on your pharmacy’s shelves? And are you concerned that a clampdown on the gray market also could negatively impact the availability of needed medicines from even legitimate secondary suppliers?

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES