HEALTH

New Azo product provides PMS relief

BY Michael Johnsen

CROMWELL, Conn. — Amerifit Brands on Wednesday launched its Azo PMS product, which has been formulated to help reduce moodiness, irritability and bloating with a variety of ingredients, including high-potency B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, folic acid and two natural herbal blends, the company stated.

The two herbal blends include an antibloating herbal diuretic with buchu leaf, cornsilk stylus, couch grass hydrangea root, juniper berry and uva ursi leaf. The combination addresses such physical symptoms as bloating and water retention. The second herbal blend of Chinese date fruit, white peony root extract, chasteberry fruit extract, ginger root extract, cramp bark and magnolia bark extract works to address such emotional symptoms as moodiness and irritability.

Premenstrual syndrome refers to a wide range of physical and emotional symptoms that typically occur five to 11 days before a woman starts her monthly menstrual cycle, and at least 85% of menstruating women have at least one PMS symptom as part of their monthly cycle. While other products address the physical symptoms of PMS, Azo PMS has the added benefit of also reducing the emotional changes caused by hormonal fluctuations associated with PMS, Amerifit noted.

Azo PMS can be taken as needed (episodically) and does not have to be taken daily to be effective. Additionally, the formula is fast-acting, affording women quick relief. The suggested retail price of Azo PMS is $7.49 for 24 blister-sealed caplets.

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Legislation seeks to preserve patient access to diabetes supplies at community pharmacies

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — Reps. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., and Peter Welch, D-Vt., on Monday introduced legislation that would exempt community pharmacies with less than 10 locations from having to participate in Medicare competitive acquisition programs and pricing when it comes to the sale of blood-glucose meters and supplies.

Under present regulations, H.R. 1936, the Medicare Access to Diabetes Supplies Act, will require that everybody who sells durable medical equipment either be included in competitive bidding or have competitive prices applied to them in 2016. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid have indicated the agency would include community pharmacists in the application of that law.

That factor could push many pharmacies out of the DME/diabetes supply business. “Without enactment of this legislation, or a comparable exemption, seniors would suffer diminished access as small pharmacies could no longer offer these supplies and provide face-to-face guidance,” stated Douglas Hoey, EVP and CEO of the National Community Pharmacists Association as part of a release in support of the bill issued Tuesday. “Most independent pharmacies will not be able to meet the competitive bidding requirement to service an entire metropolitan statistical area and to match the cut-rate bid prices of giant mail-order facilities.”

The bill was referred to both the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the Committee on Ways and Means.

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Study: Ragweed, mold behind rise in allergies

BY Michael Johnsen

MADISON, N.J. — Ragweed and mold are driving increased allergies across America, Quest Diagnostics reported Monday.

In the study, sensitization rates to common ragweed and mold increased the most of the 11 common allergens evaluated over a four-year period. Sensitization to common ragweed grew 15% nationally, while mold grew 12%. By comparison, sensitization to the 11 allergens combined increased 5.8%.

"We believe this is the first large national study to show that the growing prevalence of allergies, suggested by other studies, is largely due to increases in environment-based allergens previously associated with climate change," Quest Diagnostics medical director of immunology Stanley Naides said. "Given concerns about a warming climate, additional research is needed to confirm these findings and assess the possible implications for public health."

Between 10% and 20% of Americans are sensitive to ragweed. Increased exposure to ragweed has been shown to increase an individual’s risk of developing a ragweed allergy or of experiencing more severe allergy symptoms. Research has shown that a warming climate, by promoting longer blooming seasons, may increase both the abundance of certain environmental allergens, including ragweed, in the environment and length of the year during which people are exposed. A study published in March 2011 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences determined that the ragweed season was nearly a month longer in 2009 than it was in 1995 in certain northern areas of North America, possibly as a result of climate change.

Mold, as a precipitation-affected aeroallergen, also may increase in prevalence with a warmer climate.

The Quest Diagnostics study also ranked the 30 most populous metropolitan areas in the United States for immunoglobulin-E, or IgE, sensitization to ragweed. In the "30 Worst Big Cities for Ragweed" ranking, Phoenix; Las Vegas; Kansas City, Mo.; Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif.; and Dallas showed the highest rates of ragweed sensitization. Miami; San Francisco; Portland, Ore.; Tampa, Fla.; and San Diego showed the lowest. Those cities at the high end of the ranking showed sensitization levels nearly three times higher than those at the low end.

On a regional basis, ragweed sensitization was highest in the Southwest, Great Lakes, and Mountain and Plains states. The investigators theorized that the differences in ragweed sensitization regionally and in the most populous cities may in part be due to longer and more intense ragweed pollen seasons, but they also underscored that the reasons behind these differences are unclear and deserve additional study.

"Considering that the ragweed season traditionally begins in August, Americans suffering from ragweed allergies should expect a very long summer," Naides said. "These individuals, as well as those with other allergies or asthma, should take proactive measures to reduce their exposure to ragweed over the next several months."

The study was based on nearly 14 million test results from more than 2 million patient visits.

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