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NCPA lobbies Hawaii governor to sign two ‘pharmacy-friendly’ pieces of legislation

BY Michael Johnsen

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The National Community Pharmacists Association on Thursday urged Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie to sign two bills into law that the association asserts will "protect patient pharmacy choice." One bill prohibits pharmacy benefits managers from using a patient’s medical health information to market or advertise to that patient, and the other bill specifies that an otherwise qualified retail community pharmacy that requests to enter into a contractual retail pharmacy network agreement shall be considered part of a pharmacy benefit manager’s retail pharmacy network for purposes of a beneficiary’s right to choose where to purchase covered prescription drugs.

"NCPA strongly supports these two key pieces of legislation as a means to protect the ability of patients to choose where they want to address their medication needs," stated Douglas Hoey, NCPA CEO. "Some may wish to use mail-order pharmacies and can continue to do so under this legislation. But mail order is not for everyone, and patients should have the right to choose which type of pharmacy they prefer for their personal health needs," he said. 

"Patients should also be able to take care of their health needs with the knowledge that their personal medication records are secure and will not be used by large corporations to market a particular service or product," Hoey added. 

 

 

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Report: Real estate agent tells analysts a Walgreens flagship slated for U of Michigan

BY Michael Johnsen

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Walgreens recently negotiated a 20-year lease agreement here for Walgreens’ first university flagship location, said Joey Agree, Agree Realty president and CEO, in a conference call with analysts on Tuesday. The site will serve the University of Michigan, home to the Michigan Wolverines.

Walgreens has not yet confirmed the new site will be a prototypical flagship location, however. 

According to a report published Thursday on AnnArbor.com, Walgreens will be refitting its flagship format into an 18,000 square-foot space across three floors that last housed the Michigan Book & Supply store. 

Michigan Book & Supply closed a year ago as more and more students source their textbooks from online venues, making the location on South State and North University ideal for an omnichannel retailer like Walgreens. 

Construction of the new site is expected to be completed in the first half of 2014, Agree said. 

 

 

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Higher rate of pelvic pain found among women taking low-dose estrogen oral contraceptives

BY Alaric DeArment

SAN DIEGO — Women who take low-dose oral contraceptives may be at increased risk of chronic pelvic-pain symptoms and pain during sexual climax, according to a new study.

The study, scheduled for presentation to reporters at the American Urological Association’s annual scientific meeting in San Diego on Tuesday, was conducted by researchers at New York University and the Waitemata District Health Board in Auckland, New Zealand, compared CPPS in young women who used oral contraceptives with the condition in those who didn’t.

"This study reveals valuable insights into the relationship between oral contraceptives, pelvic pain and how effects may differ depending on hormone dosage," Drexel University College of MEdicine urology and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery chairwoman and urology and OBGYN professor Kristene Whitmore said.

The researchers used data from an anonymous, online survey of women aged 18 to 39 within large university populations but excluded those who were pregnant or who had a history of endometriosis or pelvic pain, dividing 932 respondents into those who took oral contraceptives, those who took low-dose estrogen and those who took a normal dose, defined as more than 20 micrograms.

Of the 327 respondents who used oral contraceptives, 27.1% of those who took estrogen in low doses reported pelvic pain, compared with 17.5% of non-users. Meanwhile, users of low-dose estrogen reported almost twice the incidence of pain or discomfort during or after orgasm compared to non-users, and there was no difference found between non-users and users of normal-dose estrogen. Forty percent of respondents reported onset of pain after starting on oral contraceptives and were more likely to have chronic pelvic pain symptoms than those who had symptoms prior to oral contraceptive use.

 

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