News

NBA Cares puts focus on adolescent vaccinations

BY Alaric DeArment

PHOENIX The charitable arm of the NBA is sending a basketball star out to educate parents about adolescent vaccinations.

NBA Cares hired Grant Hill of the Phoenix Suns to promote Vaccines for Teens, a national multimedia campaign to educate teenagers and their parents about vaccination against serious and potentially fatal diseases run under a partnership by the NBA, WNBA, the Society for Adolescent Medicine and Sanofi Pasteur. Diseases to which children and adolescents are susceptible range from relatively mild ones like the flu to serious ones like meningococcal disease and whooping cough.

 

Hill recently appeared at David Crockett Elementary School in Phoenix to tip off the campaign there.

 

 

“Vaccination can help teens grow into healthy adults and is beneficial for the students at David Crockett Elementary School and for teens throughout the Phoenix area,” Hill said. “In basketball, the best offense is a good defense, and the same holds true for protecting teen health.”

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

FDA to have Genzyme plant inspected, reviewed

BY Alaric DeArment

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. Genzyme Corp. will have to submit to inspections of one of its plants by the Food and Drug Administration and pay fees to the agency under a consent decree, the biotechnology company said Wednesday.

The FDA will likely hire a third party to inspect and review Genzyme’s plant in the Boston neighborhood of Allston for an extended period of time to ensure its compliance with accepted manufacturing standards. Genzyme will also have to pay the FDA for the inspections, and may have to pay other fees as well.

The action comes as a result of an incident in June 2009, when the company detected a virus that inhibits cell growth in one of the containers it uses to manufacture drugs; the virus, vesivirus 2117, is not known to cause human infection. The company said the virus was the cause of declines in productivity at two of its plants, including Allston, in 2008, and was likely introduced via a nutrient used in the manufacturing process.

In November 2009, the company found particulate matter in supplies of drugs from the Allston plant, particularly the Gaucher disease drug Cerezyme (imiglucerase), the Fabry disease drug Fabrazyme (agalsidase beta), the Pompe disease drug Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa), the mucopolysaccharidosis treatment Aldurazyme (laronidase) and the thyroid disease drug Thyrogen (thyrotropin alfa).

The drug maker said it expected shipments of the Cerezyme, Fabrazyme and Myozyme, which are manufactured at the Allston plant, to continue uninterrupted.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

SVP product development and clinical operations

BY Alaric DeArment

HAYWARD, Calif. A company that develops drugs for inflammatory diseases has made a new executive appointment.

Anthera Pharmaceuticals announced that it hired Georgina Kilfoil for the newly-created position of SVP product development and clinical operations. Prior to working for Anthera, Kilfoil was a consultant at InClin and VP alliances and project management at Peninsula Pharmaceuticals.

“Georgina brings over 18 years of project management and clinical research expertise, making her a valuable and welcome addition to our senior management team,” Anthera president and CEO Paul Truex said in a statement.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES