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Nature’s Own launches Oatmeal Toasters

BY Allison Cerra

THOMASVILLE, Ga. — Nature’s Own has introduced a new line of breakfast items.

Oatmeal Toasters are made with whole grains and real oats and studded with sweet fruit. Each square offers 4g of fiber and 20 g of whole grain and is available in cinnamon raisin and cranberry orange flavors.

"We wanted to create a recipe for something truly different and we have achieved just that with the Oatmeal Toasters," said Keith Aldredge, VP marketing/breads and rolls for Flowers Foods. "They combine the taste, texture, and portability of bagels, English muffins, and breakfast breads — all in one. Oatmeal Toasters are perfect for an on-the-go breakfast or snack, for both kids and adults. With fiber, whole grains, and only 160 calories, they are a delicious, healthy choice."

Oatmeal Toasters are sold in resealable packages of eight and currently are available at stores in the Southeast, Mid-Atlantic and Southwest.

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HDesign launches toilet paper replacement device

BY Allison Cerra

MISSOURI CITY, Texas — HDesign has introduced a toilet paper replacement device.

The EZ-I/O Changer uses the existing functionality of the typical toilet paper roller to its advantage. With the EZ-IO Changer, the toilet paper itself becomes the main object used to remove, replace, and install an empty (or full) roll of toilet paper; instead of holding onto the ends of the roller.

Additional information about this product can be found here.

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Study finds association between daily aspirin use and modestly lower cancer mortality

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — A large new observational study published Friday found more evidence of an association between daily aspirin use and modestly lower cancer mortality, but suggested any reduction may be smaller than that observed in a recent analysis. The study appeared online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

A recent analysis pooling results from existing randomized trials of daily aspirin for prevention of vascular events found an estimated 37% reduction in cancer mortality among those using aspirin for five years or more. But uncertainty remains about how much daily aspirin use may lower cancer mortality, as the size of this pooled analysis was limited and two very large randomized trials of aspirin taken every other day found no effect on overall cancer mortality, the authors of the latest study reported.

For the current study, American Cancer Society researchers led by Eric Jacobs analyzed information from 100,139 predominantly elderly participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort who reported aspirin use on questionnaires, did not have cancer at the start of the study and were followed for up to 11 years. They found daily aspirin use was associated with an estimated 16% lower overall risk of cancer mortality, both among people who reported taking aspirin daily for at least five years and among those who reported shorter term daily use. The lower overall cancer mortality was driven by about 40% lower mortality from cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (e.g., esophageal, stomach and colorectal cancer) and about 12% lower mortality from cancers outside the gastrointestinal tract.

The authors noted that their study was observational, not randomized, and therefore could have underestimated or overestimated potential effects on cancer mortality if participants who took aspirin daily had different underlying risk factors for fatal cancer than those who did not. However, the study’s large size is a strength in determining how much daily aspirin use might lower cancer mortality.

"Expert committees that develop clinical guidelines will consider the totality of evidence about aspirin’s risks and benefits when guidelines for aspirin use are next updated," Jacobs said. "Although recent evidence about aspirin use and cancer is encouraging, it is still premature to recommend people start taking aspirin specifically to prevent cancer. Even low-dose aspirin can substantially increase the risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeding. Decisions about aspirin use should be made by balancing the risks against the benefits in the context of each individual’s medical history. Any decision about daily aspirin use should be made only in consultation with a healthcare professional."
 


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