PHARMACY

NASP appoints Jim Smeeding as executive director

BY Alaric DeArment

TAMPA, Fla. — The National Association of Specialty Pharmacy has named James Smeeding its first executive director, the group said Tuesday. The announcement was made during its first Specialty Pharmacy Conference in San Diego, which drew more than 500 participants.

Smeeding is the founder of the University of Texas College of Pharmacy’s Center for Pharmacoeconomic studies and has worked for a variety of companies and organizations, including the TPG National Payor Roundtable, the Jestarx Group, Digital Health Dialog and others.

"Specialty pharmacy is the fastest-growing segment in pharmacy, and we need a strong leader to support NASP’s commitment of creating a strong, unified voice for all stakeholders," NASP CEO Gary Cohen said. "Jim is that leader. He is an experienced, skilled leader who is committed to our core values of improving patient outcomes and fostering a strong environment of collaboration."

 

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Dr. Reddy’s to move North America headquarters

BY Alaric DeArment

HYDERABAD, India — Generic drug maker Dr. Reddy’s Labs will move into a new North America headquarters and set up new laboratory space later this year, the company said Tuesday.

The India-based company said it had entered into two lease agreements for a new headquarters and research-and-development center in Princeton, N.J. These include a 75,500-sq.-ft. office space at 107 College Rd East and a 31,000-sq.-ft. office and laboratory at 303 College Rd East.

The company expects to relocate into the 107 College Rd East space by the end of this summer and finish the laboratory space at 303 College Rd East in the late summer or early fall.

The company’s current North America headquarters is in Bridgewater, N.J.

 

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Uninsured, young adults less likely to take medications as prescribed, CDC study finds

BY Alaric DeArment

NEW YORK — A desire to save money is driving younger and older adults to request cheaper drugs from their doctors, but it’s also driving younger adults not to take their drugs as prescribed, according to a new study.

The study, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that about one-fifth of adults between 18 and 64 years and one-fifth of those 65 years and older were equally likely to request lower-cost drugs, but 12.6% of those ages 18 to 64 years were likely not to take drugs as prescribed, compared with 5.8% of those 65 years and older. Meanwhile, elderly adults with only Medicare coverage were more likely to ask their doctors for lower-cost drugs to save money. Overall, Americans spent $45 million out of pocket on prescription drugs in 2011, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Lack of insurance — whether Medicaid or private insurance — was also driving medication nonadherence, with 23.1% of uninsured adults not taking their drugs properly, compared with 13.6% of those with Medicaid and 8.7% of those with private insurance.

While a number of factors drive medication nonadherence, the study — conducted by researchers at the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics — sheds light on the prevalence of nonadherence as a cost-cutting strategy, as well as the risks involved, such as higher probability of emergency room visits and hospitalizations.

The study also found that about 2% of adults bought drugs from another country to save money, while 6% of those ages 18 to 64 years used alternative therapies, compared with 2.3% of those ages 65 years and older.

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