HEALTH

NAD: Dreambrands to moderate supplement claims following advertising review

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — The National Advertising Division on Friday recommended Dreambrands modify or discontinue a wide range of advertising claims for “Add Lib,” a dietary supplement promoted to women for improved mood, energy and sexual desire.

Claims at issue included:

  • “Add Lib is an all natural supplement for women to feel better physically, mentally and emotionally — a holistic approach to sustain energy and reduce anxiety — so you can fall in love with life again.”;

  • “Increase your energy. Improve your mood. Regain your glow.”;

  • “A unique botanical blend that naturally restores energy, a healthy mood, and desire.”;

  • “Add Lib promotes energy, a healthy mood and sexual desire."; and

  • “Ignite your desire.”

Dreambrands maintained that its advertising claims were supported by published scientific literature, an independent researcher’s review of that research and the product formulation itself.

Following its review of the evidence in the record, NAD determined that the advertiser provided a reasonable basis to support claims that the ingredient, American ginseng, has been shown to enhance and improve mood. However, NAD recommended that the advertiser either discontinue the claim or modify the product or labeled dosage ensure that the product delivers a minimum of 100 mg of American ginseng per day, the amount consistent with the research shown to improve or enhance mood, promote calmness and decrease anxiety.

NAD further determined that the advertiser’s scientific evidence — including testing done on male subjects — was insufficient to support claims for improved, restored or boosted libido in females and unqualified claims of restoring, sustaining or increasing energy and recommended that these claims be discontinued.

However, NAD determined that the advertiser provided a reasonable basis for certain qualified “energy” claims provided the concept of “mental energy” is clearly explained, and directly connected to the mood benefits indicated by testing on specific ingredients in Add Lib.

“Dreambrands will modify the Add Lib formula to deliver 100 mg of American ginseng per day and will continue to use the ‘improves mood’ claims," the company replied to NAD. "We will discontinue the libido enhancement/desire claims until we can follow up with a second, more comprehensive study to more fully substantiate that Add Lib does indeed boost libido. We will also work to clearly convey the concept of ‘mental energy’ connected to mood benefits rather than the current unqualified claim."

Add Lib’s daily dosage, two capsules, delivers 120 mcg of Vitamin B12 — along with 1,310 mg of a proprietary blend containing fenugreek seed extract, American ginseng, cordyceps sinensis mycelia extract, maitake mushroom extract, wulinshen extract, passionflower herb extract, maca extract and damiana leaf extract.

NAD is an investigative unit of the advertising industry’s system of self-regulation and administered by the Council of Better Business Bureaus. As a part of its ongoing monitoring program and in conjunction with NAD’s initiative with the Council for Responsible Nutrition designed to expand review of advertising claims for dietary supplements, NAD requested the advertiser provide substantiation for claims made in print and Internet advertising and on product labeling. 


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McNeil Consumer recalls one lot of Imodium on wholesale level due to damaged package

BY Michael Johnsen

FORT WASHINGTON, Pa. — McNeil Consumer Healthcare on Thursday informed its wholesale customers that it is voluntarily recalling one lot of Imodium multi-symptom relief 18 caplets due to a packaging issue that may have impacted a limited number of blister units in this lot.

The product is being recalled at the wholesale level only, and not from consumers or from store shelves, as there are no safety concerns or adverse events related to the reason for the recall. The lot number (CMF023) for the recalled product can be found on the side of the product box.

The product is packaged on blister cards with six caplets in blister units on each card. An internal quality review discovered the potential for a limited number of blister units to have dents with a small pinhole or tear.


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CDC: Chronic disease states less prevalent as education, household income rise

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — People with higher levels of education and higher income have lower rates of many chronic diseases compared with those with less education and lower income levels, according to "Health, United States, 2011" — the government’s annual comprehensive report on Americans’ health released Wednesday.

"Health, United States, 2011" is the 35th annual report prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics, and includes a compilation of health data through 2010 from a number of sources within the federal government and in the private sector.

This year’s edition features a special section on socioeconomic status and health. Among the highlights:

  • In 2007-2010, higher levels of education among the head of household resulted in lower rates of obesity among boys and girls 2 years to 19 years of age. In households where the head of household had less than a high school education, 24% of boys and 22% of girls were obese. In households where the head had a bachelor’s degree or higher, obesity prevalence was 11% for males aged 2 years to 19 years and 7% for females;
  • In 2007-2010, women 25 years of age and older with less than a bachelor’s degree were more likely to be obese (39% to 43%) than those with a bachelor’s degree or higher (25%). Obesity prevalence among adult males did not vary consistently with level of education;
  • In 2010, 31% of adults 25 years to 64 years of age with a high school diploma or less education were current smokers, compared with 24% of adults with some college and 9% of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher. Overall, in the same year, 19% of U.S. adults age 18 years and older were current cigarette smokers, a decline from 21% in 2009;
  • Between 1996 and 2006, the gap in life expectancy at age 25 years between those with less than a high school education and those with a bachelor’s degree or higher increased by 1.9 years for men and 2.8 years for women; and
  • Between 2000 and 2010, the percentage of children with a family income below 200% of poverty level who were uninsured decreased from 22% to 11% to 13%. The percentage with a family income at 200% to 399% of the poverty level who were uninsured decreased from 9% to 7%, and children with a family income at 400% of the poverty level who were uninsured decreased from 3% to 2%.

The full report, a 583-page document, is available here.

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