News

NACDS calls for unified approach to drug abuse in Public Health and Preparedness bill

BY Antoinette Alexander

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Prescription drug abuse and diversion merit a coordinated response across federal agencies, and pending legislation can advance this unified approach, stated National Association of Chain Drug Stores president and CEO Steve Anderson in a letter to senators.

In the letter, sent to Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions chairman Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and ranking member Mike Enzi, R-Wyo., NACDS urged the senators to include a provision to create a commission or advisory group consisting of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Drug Enforcement Administration and other stakeholders in the Pandemic All-Hazards Preparedness Act of 2011.

“Although the activities and recommendations of the advisory group should be broad in scope, recommendations should include specific direction for federal agencies to carry out,” Anderson wrote. “Most importantly, there should be an agreement from all participants to support this collaborative result.  We believe this would implement sound federal policies for combating the public health scourges of prescription drug diversion and abuse.”

Anderson also noted in the letter views on two other topics related to public health and emergency preparedness: The role of chain pharmacies in services, including immunizations, and the importance of pharmaceutical supply chain integrity.

“NACDS strongly advocates for the expansion of pharmacists’ abilities to provide immunizations so that we may provide immunization services to prevent and mitigate pandemic illnesses,” Anderson wrote.

Regarding supply chain issues, Anderson stated, “…we understand that PAHPA may be a vehicle for adding supply chain integrity legislative language currently under consideration and development by the committees of jurisdiction and through the efforts of Sens. [Michael] Bennet, D-Colo., and [Richard] Burr, R-N.C. As a member of the Pharmaceutical Distribution Security Alliance, we support these efforts and look forward to seeing the legislative language under development.”

As reported by Drug Store News, NACDS submitted earlier in the week a hearing statement to the U.S. Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control regarding drug abuse strategies.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

CDC: National pertussis rates are on the rise; agency urges pregnant women to get vaccine

BY Michael Johnsen

ATLANTA — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday held a press briefing regarding the growing number of whooping cough cases in Washington state, which, according to the CDC, is reflective of how pertussis cases are trending nationally.

"Above all, I want to urge vaccination for pregnant women and anyone who will have contact with babies. We’re seeing a substantial increase in pertussis cases in the United States and in individual states like Washington," said Anne Schuchat, director for the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at CDC. "As of today, nationwide, nearly 18,000 cases have been reported to CDC. That’s more than twice as many as we had at the same time last year," Schuchat said. "In fact, it’s more than we had in each of the past five years. … We may need to go back to 1959 to find a year with as many cases reported by this time so far."

Washington declared a pertussis epidemic on April 3, when 640 cases were reported. Today, there are more than 3,000. "Most counties in our state have reported cases and for every case we know about, we expect there are many people out there who have pertussis and don’t know about it," said Mary Selecky of the Washington state health department.

To date, nine babies have died due to the whooping cough outbreak, Schuchat said. Whooping cough is most dangerous with infants. "In this current wave nationally, we’re seeing the highest rates of pertussis in infants younger than one year of age. About half of these cases are babies under three months of age," Schuchat said. "That’s because those very young babies are too young to be protected by vaccines that they start getting at two months of age. Their protection instead depends on the immunity of the people around them, especially pregnant women, their mothers."

CDC also is tracking higher pertussis rates in children between the ages of 13 and 14. The agency surmised that protection provided through early-childhood vaccines may be waning and recommend children get a booster of the pertussis vaccine at 11-to-12 years of age.

"[But] given how dangerous pertussis is for babies, preventing infant deaths for the disease is our primary national goal," Schuchat said. "CDC continues to recommend that all children and adults get fully vaccinated to prevent infection and to protect infants. Getting Tdap is especially important for women and those that will be around infants, grandparents, brothers and sisters, childcare workers and health care providers." However, only 8% of adults had any history of receiving a Tdap booster in 2010. "I know we can do better than this. We need to do better than this."

According to Schuchat, the booster shot Tdap as been administered to about 69% of children between the ages of 13 and 17. Approximately 84% of toddlers between 19 months and 35 months have gotten four doses of the Tdap series; 95% have gottent three doses.


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?
News

Nestle Health Science takes stake in Accera

BY Alaric DeArment

BROOMFIELD, Colo. — A division of Nestle has bought a stake in a Colorado-based drug maker focused on treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

Accera announced that Nestle Health Science would invest in the company to support the development and commercialization of Axona, which it described as a prescription medical food for clinical dietary management of the metabolic processes associated with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Nestle Health Science president and CEO Luis Cantarell will take a seat on Accera’s board of directors.

"Nestle Health Science’s investment will enable us to make larger clinical trials and help us strengthen our commercial capabilities in the U.S.," Accera president and CEO Holder Kunze said. "It will also provide an opportunity to expand the geographic footprint of Axona longer-term."


Interested in this topic? Sign up for our weekly DSN Collaborative Care e-newsletter.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

Polls

Which area of the industry do you think Amazon’s entry would shake up the most?