HEALTH

Max-Wellness launches healthcare kiosks, revamps website offering

BY Michael Johnsen

CLEVELAND — Max-Wellness is preparing to introduce its “Wellness-in-a-Box” concept — an automated dispensing device located in a variety of unique venues featuring health-and-wellness products that customers can purchase at any time using a debit or credit card. The concept is slated to make its debut in March, the company stated.

Wellness-in-a-Box is slated to be positioned in airports, urgent care centers, senior living facilities, hotels, casinos and fitness centers. The freestanding, self-service wellness centers will provide a relevant offering of products for head-to-toe care tailored to meet the needs of customers in the venue where it is located.

Max-Wellness also recently launched an expanded e-commerce website at Max-Wellness.com. The e-commerce site offers an assortment of vitamins and supplements and healthcare solutions, an offering that will grow through 2012 with the addition of approximately 1,000 new items each week, the company stated. Max-Wellness expects to field almost 20,000 products by the end of the year.

The company’s Max-Answers knowledge base, available in its stores in the form of a computer tablet or iPad, has been incorporated into the site as well. Visitors to the site can utilize this feature to search the database for self-care information, including health conditions, vitamins and supplements, and drug-nutrient interactions.

Additionally, Max-Answers contains an A-Z index for vitamins, supplements, health conditions, drugs and food; health-related articles and news; food and recipe information; and Vitamin Advisor, a questionnaire that users can fill out to help them determine the best vitamins and supplements for their needs.

"By offering effective answers and accessible solutions to living a healthier, more active lifestyle, this new and improved e-commerce initiative furthers the Max-Wellness customer promise and its mission to provide products and answers for healthy living," stated Michael Feuer, Max-Wellness CEO.

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HEALTH

Study: Bausch + Lomb’s Biotrue helps maintain tear film’s natural antibacterial activity

BY Michael Johnsen

PHILADELPHIA — A study on Bausch + Lomb’s Biotrue multipurpose contact lens solution published in the January edition of the journal Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice found that the solution can help improve eye health.

The solution helps maintain the antibacterial and bacteriolytic activity of tear film proteins, proteins that offer benefits that help keep eyes healthy, including natural defense against bacteria that can cause eye infections. Under normal conditions, the antimicrobial and other functions of the tear film proteins may be lost after denaturation (the breaking down of the cell walls) during contact lens wear.

 


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Performance booster supplement DMAA draws national media attention

BY Michael Johnsen

DALLAS — The Department of Defense’s investigation of a sports supplement ingredient — associated with the death of two soldiers — has been making headlines in the past week as the U.S. Military’s independent paper Stars & Stripes ran an update of the news on Jan. 29 and the New York Times picked up on the story Feb. 2. 

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service in December pulled 18 supplements containing dimethylamylamine, or DMAA, that were sold on Army and Air Force bases through GNC because of a potential link to the deaths of two soldiers, according to a Stars & Stripes story published Dec. 5. The issue appears to be similar to that of ephedra, a dietary ingredient banned by the Food and Drug Administration in 2004. Ephedra generated national headlines as the deaths of two professional athletes — Korey Stringer of the National Football League’s Minnesota Vikings and Steve Bechler of Major League Baseball’s Baltimore Orioles — were linked to the use of ephedra supplementation. Like ephedra, DMAA is used as a performance booster.

A subsequent Stars & Stripes report confirmed that the U.S. Army soon thereafter began investigating the link between DMAA supplementation and the deaths of the two soldiers, both of whom suffered heart attacks, following toxicology reports that were positive for DMAA. "The Army launched an ongoing safety review after recording a number of other serious health effects among known and potential users of products containing DMAA including ‘kidney and liver failure, seizures, loss of consciousness, heat injury and muscle breakdown during exertion, and rapid heartbeat,’" the military daily reported Dec. 15, citing a written response from Army spokeswoman Maria Tolleson.

“Compared to the handful of adverse event reports recently cited by the Army, GNC has sold 440 million doses of product containing DMAA since 2007 and has not received a single serious adverse event report,” GNC spokesman Greg Miller told Stars & Stripes, according to the report.

The manufacturer identified in the reports is USPLabs, which is selling the DMAA supplements under such brand names as Jack3d and OxyElite Pro.

For the Dec. 29 Stars & Stripes story, click here.

For the Feb. 2 the New York Times story, click here.

For the original Dec. 5 Stars & Stripes story, click here.


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