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Market trend spotter names new confectionery creations

BY Jenna Duncan

LONDON New confectionery items to hit the market include an energy-boosting lollipop in a can, chocolate-flavored sea salt and edible flowers, according to international trend spotter Datamonitor’s Productscan database, a server that tracks launches of new products.

A lollipop-flavored energy drink, MAXXED, infused with B vitamins, ginseng, guarana and taurine, and also containing caffeine is being produced by the Charms Company (under umbrella company, Tootsie Roll Industries, Chicago, Ill.).

A chocolate-flavored sea salt is being produced by Barhyte Specialty Foods of Pendleton, Ore., as part of the company’s Lords of Salt line. Barhyte says it uses Dagoba Organic Chocolate, organically harvested by hand from the Ria Formosa nature park in southern Portugal.

And edible flowers by Flor & Flor are now being imported to the U.S. from Grasse, France’s confection maker Florinnov. The company “crystallizes” whole jasmine, rose and violet buds for use as garnishes and cake decorations.

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Budweiser unveils new ale coming to stores this fall

BY Jenna Duncan

CHICAGO Anheuser-Busch says it will release its new beer, Budweiser American Ale, this fall.

According to Anheuser-Busch’s vice president of consumer strategy and innovation, Marlene Coulis, the new brew will be a darker, richer beer than Budweiser lager.

Just a few weeks prior, rival Miller Brewing announced a new line of craft-style beers under the Miller Lite brand—the Miller Lite Brewers Collection,

But Coulis says Anheuser-Busch wasn’t copying competitors, the brewer was simply expanding on their craft and imported Michelob brand.

Coulis said branching out could help the core brands by bringing new beer enthusiasts to the Bud family. “We believe this will positively reflect on Budweiser,” she said. “It’ll help us reach a whole new set of consumers.”

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U.S. study finds healthier, low-calorie foods more expensive

BY Jenna Duncan

SEATTLE A recently released study from the University of Washington reports that the prices of high-calorie foods are less likely to be impacted by inflation. As a result, the cost of low-calorie foods can rise more readily with inflation and that could mean less access to healthy food options for lower income Americans.

Researchers at the University of Washington used funding from the USDA’s Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service to study price trends at Seattle-area supermarkets. They compared the costs of around 370 foods by calorie density and price. They concluded that on average high-calorie foods cost less per calorie while low-calorie foods were more expensive. They also found trends that indicate that the price of high-calorie food is less likely to rise as a result of inflation, keeping high-calorie foods cheaper.

The researchers say that these findings may explain why calorie-dense foods are chosen more frequently by lower-income individuals.

“If you have $3 to feed yourself, your choices gravitate toward foods which give you the most calories per dollar. Not only are the empty calories cheaper, but the healthy foods are becoming more and more expensive. Fresh vegetables and fruits are rapidly becoming luxury goods,” said Adam Drewnowski, director of the Center for Public Health and Nutrition at the University of Washington.

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