PHARMACY

Low-dose aspirin recommendations revised for younger diabetic patients

BY Allison Cerra

NEW YORK Findings published in the online edition of Diabetes Care have indicated that diabetics under a certain age should not use low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attacks.

The recommendations, which indicated that diabetic men under the age of 50 years and diabetic women under the age of 60 years should not use aspirin, were made based on an analysis of nine studies that found that the risks of such side effects as stomach bleeding and — to a much lesser extent — bleeding strokes, have to be better balanced against the potential benefits of using aspirin. Although diabetics face a higher risk of heart disease, the findings suggested that aspirin be used only by diabetics who have other risk factors and are older.

The findings have been endorsed by the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

“The larger theme here is that use of low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attacks in people who have not already experienced one is probably not as efficacious as we used to believe it was,” said Craig Williams, an associate professor in the College of Pharmacy at Oregon State University, and one of the experts on the recent review panel. “With any medication, you have to balance the benefits against possible side effects or risks. But even a baby aspirin has some degree of risk, even though it’s very low, so we have to be able to show clear benefits that outweigh that risk. In the case of young adults with diabetes but no other significant risk factors, it’s not clear that the benefits are adequate to merit use of aspirin.”

Additional studies in patients with diabetes are being conducted to further demonstrate exactly who would best benefit from aspirin therapy, Williams said.

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PHARMACY

Target to expand its retail clinic presence

BY Antoinette Alexander

MINNEAPOLIS Target is looking to open eight new clinic locations this September, which includes new clinics at Target stores in Chicago and three in the Palm Beach, Fla., area.

Target introduced the Target Clinic in 2006 and currently operates 28 nurse practitioner-staffed locations in Minnesota and Maryland.

"Target is committed to helping our guests and team members achieve total well-being," stated Keri Jones, SVP health and beauty for Target. "By offering convenient, affordable and high quality care with no appointment necessary, Target Clinic is the perfect solution for busy families."

Construction is underway at the Evanston, South Loop and Near North Chicago Target stores. In early June, construction will begin at the Broadview and Tinley locations as well as the three Palm Beach-area Target stores. The eight new Target Clinic locations are expected to be open in early September.

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Costco installs health kiosks in Canada pharmacies

BY Alaric DeArment

PORTLAND, Ore. — Mass merchandiser Costco is adding information kiosks to its 25 pharmacies in Canada’s Ontario province.

Aisle7, the U.S.-based company that makes the kiosks, said the kiosks would make customer self-care education on generic and branded drugs, as well as drug information, available through an interactive kiosk-based display.

“We’re excited to offer our shoppers the Aisle7 program as an extention to the services we provide in our pharmacy,” Costco assistant VP pharmacy eastern division for the United States and Canada Rick Duffy said. “Aisle7 provides us with a credible, easy-to-use information resource for our shoppers, as well as a customizable marketing platform to promote our monthly health events.”

 

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