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Living up to its mission

BY Rob Eder

About 20 years ago, I took a job as senior editor for Drug Store News. My first beat assignment was the OTC business and about a dozen retail companies, including CVS Pharmacy. Back then, CVS had just won the right to buy Revco, and it was making regular headlines in Drug Store News-FIRST — the weekly news-fax (remember those?) edition of DSN that would later become our daily e-newsletter DSN A.M. — as it completed the biggest integration of stores and systems in the history of the retail pharmacy business.

You could say I’ve seen a lot of change in that time, as CVS has evolved from what was then very much still a big Northeastern-based drug chain to the massive healthcare innovation company it is today. Its transformation over the years has been pretty remarkable.

But for all of the news it has made over the years, this might be the most important headline in the history of the company: CVS has never had a clearer, more defined sense of purpose than it does today. To steal a phrase from Brian Owens, director of retail insights for Kantar Retail, CVS knows who it is and what it stands for; it stands for health.

Today, its stores have become the physical embodiment of its mission to help people on their path to better health.

In this issue, DSN profiles what CVS Pharmacy is doing to re-engineer the entire store around health in an exclusive report.

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Hispanic healthcare journey

BY DSN STAFF

Winning with U.S. Hispanics is the solution to accelerating sales growth. Univision partnered with Nielsen to study the Hispanic Healthcare Journey and uncover differences and similarities between Hispanic and non-Hispanic attitudes and behaviors. This new, groundbreaking research explores how patients manage their path to treatment and follows consumers’ path to purchase for the total OTC market and the key categories of pain, vitamins, cough-cold, and allergy remedies.

To download the whitepaper, visit DrugStoreNews.com/article/hispanic-healthcare-journey-otc-path-purchase.

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Bartell Drugs now offering accessible prescription labels for visually impaired patients

BY Gina Acosta

SEATTLE — Bartell Drugs is now offering three solutions for persons with visual impairment who cannot read the print on their prescription drug container labels. 

Patients can receive either ScripTalk audible labels, ScripView large print labels, or Braille labels based on their need.  Accessible prescription labels help low-vision patients safely and independently manage their medications and communicate more effectively with their pharmacist about their prescription needs.

“It’s extremely important that patients know and understand the instructions for their medications,” said Bartell Drugs’ VP of pharmacy operations and clinical services, Billy Chow. “This can be challenging for our patients with visual impairments. Having this system guarantees those individuals full and unhindered access to accurate information in a format that is tailored for their needs.”

ScripTalk is an audible prescription reader. The ScripTalk label is embedded with a microchip and is programmed with all the printed label data. The patient places the container onto a small hand-held reader, and with the press of a button, is able to listen to the information including patient name, drug name and instructions, pharmacy contact information, warnings and more. Deaf-Blind users can request ScripTalk User software to export text to their Braille browser display. The ScripTalk reader is provided free by En-Vision America, Inc.

ScripView is a large-print, booklet-style label attached to the prescription container. It provides easy access to the prescription label for those with low vision. The label contains all the same information as the pharmacy's regular label, but in large print.  The pharmacist can edit the font size based upon the need of the patient.

Braille label tape can be added to a prescription with basic medication information.

The accessible label service is free to those who request it.  

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