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The Little Clinic partners with University of Louisville Physicians

BY Antoinette Alexander

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Little Clinic has announced a collaborative affiliation with the University of Louisville Physicians’ Preventive Cardiology practice, which marks the third affiliation that The Little Clinic has formed with a medical group.

The partnership focuses on the management of hypertension for patients currently without a primary care physician. The relationship will create more convenient and affordable treatment by offering much of the ongoing monitoring for hypertension at The Little Clinic locations inside select Louisville Kroger stores.

“By partnering with University of Louisville Physicians, we’re able to assist in the identification and monitoring of hypertension, a condition that millions of Americans face, a large percentage without even knowing,” stated Ken Patric, chief medical officer for The Little Clinic. “Because we are open seven days a week, including evenings, The Little Clinic is able to bridge the gap between scheduling healthcare appointments and competing demands with a convenient option for patients seeking care."

“Our first clinics opened in Louisville in 2003, and it’s exciting to continue to grow in this market. The communities surrounding these clinics have been great hosts, and we believe this relationship will benefit them tremendously,” Patric added. 

Locations currently offering the hypertension-monitoring program include:

  • The Little Clinic: 5533 New Cut Road, Louisville;
  • The Little Clinic: 2219 Holiday Manor Center, Louisville;
  • The Little Clinic: 234 Eastbrook Pkwy., Mt. Washington; and
  • The Little Clinic: 9440 Brownsboro Road, Louisville.

“The collaboration with The Little Clinic is a wonderful opportunity for University of Louisville Physicians to expand our reach in the community,” stated ULP cardiologist Marcus Stoddard. “We are excited to serve as a resource for hypertensive patients and offer them access to our world-class cardiologists.”

This affiliation is the third that The Little Clinic has formed with a leading medical group. The Little Clinic and the Ohio State University Medical Center developed a partnership in 2011 at its Lewis Center, Ohio, clinic and also recently signed an affiliation agreement with the University of Colorado.

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R.HAMMERLE says:
Jul-03-2012 08:45 am

As the nation's leading retail clinic owned by a supermarket, TLC is just beginning to tap its opportunities in the field of preventive health services with this focus on hypertension. Two other major chronic diseases (obesity and diabetes) also seem natural foci, since all three involve food as a cause, cure or key for disease management. Still, one has to wonder-- after the retail clinic industry has spent more than a decade trying to establish a sustainable economic model-- why their owners have not incorporated higher income medical services and why their owners don't see them as integrated ports of entry for the retailers' own, self-insured employees. In Kroger's case, that could bring in 300,000 new patients a year without ever having to sell the service outside the company's own base of employees. Ron Hammerle Chairman and CEO Health Resources, Ltd. Tampa, Florida

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Conversion under way for Genuardi’s stores in greater Philadelphia market

BY Allison Cerra

CARLISLE, Pa. — Giant Food has commenced its conversion of 15 former Genuardi’s stores.

The announcement follows Giant Food, an Ahold subsidiary, getting the green light from the Federal Trade Commission for its plan to acquire 15 Genuardi’s stores, located in the greater Philadelphia area, from Safeway.

During the conversion process, five stores at a time will temporarily close for about a week. The three-phase staggered approach is expected to be completed on July 22.

"During the three weeks of conversion, we will strive to minimize the amount of disruption to our customers," Giant Food Stores president Rick Herring said. "Giant is committed to this multi-million dollar investment to improve the overall shopping experience in these 15 stores to meet the quality, selection and savings that customers have come to expect from Giant."

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Treating vitamin D deficiency may improve depression among women

BY Allison Cerra

CHEVY CHASE, Md. — A case report series presented at the Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston examined how women with moderate to severe depression could see an improvement in symptoms if they are treated for their vitamin D deficiency.

Sonal Pathak, an endocrinologist at Bayhealth Medical Center in Dover, Del., presented research findings from three women, ages 42 to 66 years, all of whom were previously diagnosed with major depressive disorder and were receiving antidepressant therapy. The patients also were being treated for either Type 2 diabetes or an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism). Over eight to 12 weeks, the women were given oral vitamin D replacement therapy to restore their vitamin D status to normal (32 to 38 ng/mL) after experiencing levels that ranged from 8.9 to 14.5 ng/mL. Levels below 21 ng/mL are considered vitamin D deficiency, while normal vitamin D levels are above 30 ng/mL, according to the Endocrine Society.

After treatment, all three women reported significant improvement in their depression, as found using the Beck Depression Inventory, a 21-item questionnaire that scores the severity of sadness and other symptoms of depression. A score of zero to nine indicates minimal depression; 10 to 18, mild depression; 19 to 29, moderate depression; and 30 to 63, severe depression.

One patient’s depression score improved from 32 before vitamin D therapy to 12, a change from severe to mild depression. The second patient’s score fell from 26 to 8, indicating she now had minimal symptoms of depression. The third patient’s score of 21 improved after vitamin D treatment to 16, also in the mild range.

"Vitamin D may have an as-yet-unproven effect on mood, and its deficiency may exacerbate depression," Pathak said. "If this association is confirmed, it may improve how we treat depression. Screening at-risk depressed patients for vitamin D deficiency and treating it appropriately may be an easy and cost-effective adjunct to mainstream therapies for depression."


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