HEALTH

LifeScan, Apple demonstrate prototype diabetes management software

BY Michael Johnsen

MILPITAS, Calif. Johnson & Johnson’s LifeScan on Tuesday demonstrated a prototype diabetes management software application, integrating the company’s OneTouch blood glucose meters with the Apple iPhone and iPod touch products. LifeScan was one of a handful of companies invited by Apple to develop and preview innovative new applications at Apple’s iPhone OS 3.0 software event, the company stated.

Using a modified OneTouch Meter, the prototype application demonstrated transmission of a blood glucose test result to the Apple iPhone. Once on the iPhone, test results were available for integration with other information in a series of user-friendly graphics, including the user’s level of glucose control over time relative to targets established with his or her healthcare professional.

The application also will include a customizable food database to help users determine the amount of carbohydrates consumed during meals. Future applications also may include the capability for users to calculate a bolus insulin dose based on the last glucose result and the number of carbohydrates that will be consumed.

A demo of the new product functionalities is available at  www.apple.com/iphone/preview-iphone-os. The LifeScan demo begins at approximately the 43 minute, 32 seconds mark.

The new OneTouch/iPhone application is in the early stages of development, the company noted.

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Hyland’s Borneman receives honorary degree from University of Sciences in Philadelphia

BY Allison Cerra

KING OF PRUSSIA, Pa. The University of Sciences in Philadelphia recently awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree to Hyland’s Jack Borneman, III, Hyland’s announced Tuesday.

The honor was granted at the University’s 188th Founders’ Day celebration and is in recognition of Borneman’s lifetime commitment to the development and regulation of homeopathic medicine within the United States.

“We are very proud to have Jack Borneman as a member of our team,” stated Jack’s son J.P. Borneman, chairman and CEO, Hyland’s. “We are especially pleased to have University of the Sciences honor his lifetime of work with this honorary degree. His work in homeopathic medicine has been passionate and ceaseless. As this industry grows, we know we owe a tremendous sense of gratitude to [Jack] and his contemporaries for all they have done and continue to do.”

University president Philip Gerbino addressed Borneman’s leadership in the healthcare industry, stating that, “[He] has been at the forefront of standards and change for homeopathy, creating a foundation from which future generations of homeopaths can continue to build upon.”

In 1980, Jack Borneman was a founding director of the newly incorporated Homoeopathic Pharmacopoeia Convention of the United States, and in 1983, he was elected the second president of the organization.

In the course of his 25 years as president, his leadership evolved HPCUS into a respected international body of scientists and experts consulted by governments worldwide as the leader in homeopathic regulation. His work has led to the wide availability of standardized, high-quality medications to the general public. In August 2008, Borneman assumed the role of HPCUS chairman.

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Naturally Vitamins launches dietary supplement for food intolerances

BY Michael Johnsen

PHOENIX Naturally Vitamins last week launched Histame, a dietary supplement formula for consumers who suffer from food intolerance.

The active ingredient in Histame, enzyme diamine oxidase, has been acknowledged by the Food and Drug Administration as a new dietary ingredient, the company noted.

It is estimated that up to 25% of the population suffers from food intolerance, an adverse reaction to foods rich in histamine due to a deficiency of the body’s digestive enzyme. Effects can range from common digestive problems including abdominal pain and spasms, diarrhea, constipation and flatulence, to facial flushing, headaches, nasal congestion, skin rash and itching.

Histamine levels are naturally high in certain foods, including bananas, pizza, tomatoes, chocolate, select cheese, processed and smoked meats, sausages, coffee, wine and beer.

Many food intolerances are confused with food allergies, Naturally Vitamins noted, explaining that a food allergy is an abnormal response to food, triggered by the body’s immune system. In contrast, nonallergenic histamine food intolerance is mostly brought on by foods not processed properly in the intestinal tract.

KelloggsDRSNhttp://www.centerstoregrowth.com

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