HEALTH

Lazy Susans, tie racks and front-store merchandising

BY Dave Wendland

My daughter and I were experimenting in the kitchen the other evening — cooking up what was sure to be a masterpiece. Reaching into the lazy Susan in the spice cabinet, I had a eureka moment.

To be honest, this is not the first time that this fleeting thought has crossed my mind. But it resurfaced with a vengeance when my daughter commented about the lazy Susan, “This is so cool. Everything I need is just a quick spin away from being right in front of me.”

So, imagine this idea executed in store. I’m shopping for a sleep remedy and I go to a 24-inch-wide area of the shelf labeled, “Restful Nights.” Carefully gliding the circular turntable I’m able to select from a range of remedies for my nighttime struggles. In fact, within the same amount of merchandising space, there is now room for two times or more the merchandise. This frees up shelf space, improves shopability and organizes the category more compactly. Managing the inventory and restocking the shelves may become more difficult, but increasing the productivity of the square footage could more than justify it.

Although I would not recommend this for every category and every shelf, think about those that could benefit from being grouped in such a manner. It may be the ideal way to spice up your merchandising.

While I’m on the bandwagon of organization, I had another epiphany that translates to retail. Merchandising compression hosiery is among the most difficult categories encountered. There are a number of attributes that they can be organized by, and streamlining them to make it easy for shoppers to navigate is a daunting task. It’s one of those departments that takes up too much space for the frequency that it is shopped.

To solve the problem within the hosiery category, I’ll use my closet as an example. I have too many neckties. There are holiday-themed ties, sports team-themed ties, and those worn only once because they looked better in the store than around my neck. But storing these ties is solved by a closet organization system that permits me to hook them on a sliding mechanism that recedes between my sport coats, and can easily be pulled out to expose the full array.

Now imagine this concept applied to your store. You create a shelf organization system for compression hosiery that sits alongside the shelved products and can be pulled out to expose the full range of stockings. Not only does it minimize the space required on the pegged wall, it also organizes them by size, compression percentage, or some other factor that makes shopping easier.

There you have it. Some pretty good shelf organizational ideas that already exist and simply require a bit of tweaking and reapplication to meet unsolved needs at the retail shelf.


Dave Wendland is vice president and co-owner of Hamacher Resource Group, a retail healthcare consultancy located near Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He directs business development, product innovation and marketing communications activities for the company and has been instrumental in positioning HRG among the industry’s foremost thought leaders. You may contact him at (414) 431-5301 or learn more at Hamacher.com.

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Oregon passes DXM age restriction law

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — To combat teen abuse of over-the-counter medicines containing the cough suppressant dextromethorphan, Oregon Governor Kate Brown on Thursday signed legislation prohibiting the sale of DXM-containing products to minors.

The move makes Oregon the 14th state to pass an age-18 sales law, joining states across the country in recognizing that limiting teen access to DXM is a proven way to prevent abuse, according to the Consumer Healthcare Products Association.

“Public policy and education are both vitally important to combating teen OTC cough medicine abuse,” stated Scott Melville, president and CEO CHPA. “This is why CHPA has long supported state efforts to limit teen access to DXM and has worked to increase parental awareness through its StopMedicineAbuse.org campaign. This new law will help raise awareness about the issue with parents, while ensuring access for the millions of families who responsibly use products containing DXM to treat common cough symptoms.”

While millions of Americans use products containing DXM to safely treat their symptoms, according to the 2016 National Institute on Drug Abuse annual Monitoring the Future survey, one in 30 teens abuse OTC cough medicine containing DXM to get high.

In 2012, California became the first state to prohibit sales to minors. Since then, governors from Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Jersey, New York, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, and most recently Nevada, have all signed similar laws.
 

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Nature’s Bounty named a Long Island Business News Corporate Citizen of the Year

BY Michael Johnsen

RONKONKOMA, N.Y. — Nature’s Bounty on Thursday announced it is the recipient of the Long Island Business News Corporate Citizen of the Year Award.

Nominated by the Girl Scouts of Suffolk County, Nature's Bounty was selected as a member of the 2017 class of Corporate Citizenship honorees. The award recognizes the significant contributions companies and individuals make to better the economic and social well-being of the Long Island community. Nature's Bounty was honored in the Corporate Citizen of the Year, Large Business category.

"The Corporate Citizenship Awards recognize companies and individuals who believe that by being a good corporate citizen they contribute to the economic and social well-being of their employees, businesses and the community," said Scott Schoen, publisher of the Long Island Business News. "Honorees consistently prove that true community stewardship evolves through building strong partnerships with nonprofit organizations and others that strive to meet the critical needs of our community."

"We could not be more honored or proud to have received this award," said Beverly Lee-Wo, director corporate social responsibility at The Nature's Bounty Co. "There are so many people in our local communities who need a hand, and there are so many charitable organizations doing amazing work to help them. We remain committed to spreading wellness however we can, including through our charitable partnerships. We extend our thanks to The Girl Scouts of Suffolk County for nominating us, and the Long Island Business News for selecting us to receive this award."

"The Nature's Bounty Co., its 501C3 Nature's Bounty Foundation and its volunteers, consistently and thoughtfully give back to the local Long Island community in so many ways," said Mary Garrote from Girl Scouts of Suffolk County. "We, and I'm sure many other charitable organizations, are thankful for their selfless commitment and their contributions to bettering the lives of people on Long Island."

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