HEALTH

Ladibugs launches lice removal brand through hair salons

BY Michael Johnsen

MINNEAPOLIS — Ladibugs on Tuesday announced the launch of its Ladibugs Hair Care — a chemical-free head lice product line — through more than 1,000 Great Clips locations.

"Families deal with an estimated 6 to 12 million lice infestations each year in the United States, and before now they have had to rely on caustic, chemical-laden products that leave kids with burning eyes and produce mixed results," Ladibugs co-founder Lisa Rudquist said. "Parents do not know where to turn when they find a lice infestation, and many times it is after bath or bedtime so we have our team of lice experts available to help parents through it 24-hours a day."

Ladibugs hair care products include both lice elimination and prevention solutions ranging from $9 to $22.

The elimination products include Ladibugs mousse made from a yeast based enzyme, a natural dissolver of nit glue; Ladibugs mint serum, a nontoxic, pesticide-free serum blended with olive oil and peppermint that soothes the scalp while eliminating the louse; and the Ladibugs metal micro-grooved comb.

Ladibugs also carries a full line of prevention products safe to use daily for the entire family. Ladibugs shampoo and conditioner are made with peppermint oil. When used daily, the shampoo and conditioner help defend hair from lice infestation, Ladibugs noted. In addition to the shampoo and conditioner, Ladibugs also offerings include a mint spray, a lice-fighting tool that uses a specialized mint formula to help ward off head lice.


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New Mud Energy Gel hydration product launched

BY Michael Johnsen

NEW YORK — An energy product formulated with Sustamine, an ingredient created by Kyowa Hakko USA, has hit the market.

Mud Energy Gel is designed to work on multiple levels to help rehydrate the body and sustain energy levels during exertion. The product contains Sustamine, a trademarked dipeptide ingredient that combines the amino acids L-alanine and L-glutamine to help the body rehydrate, the company said.

"Mud Energy is a great product for Sustamine because it provides a variety of choices and flavors for endurance athletes who know that staying hydrated may mean finishing a triathlon more quickly because they may maintain their endurance longer," Kyowa Hakko USA director of marketing Karen Todd said.

A University of Central Florida study revealed a 12.5% difference in the shooting performance of basketball athletes between the trial where no hydration was allowed and the one where players drank 1 g of Sustamine in 500 mL of water; an 11% increase was seen between the Sustamine trial and the one where only water was consumed.

The study’s findings were published in the March 2012 edition of the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. A copy of the Sustamine study can be found here.


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CRN urges FDA to reconsider provisions in New Dietary Ingredient Draft Guidance

BY Michael Johnsen

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration’s New Dietary Ingredient Draft Guidance should not give the agency pre-market approval over new dietary supplement products, the Council for Responsible Nutrition claimed Monday in a commentary published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the official journal of the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology.

“The draft guidance attempts to apply the notification requirement to new supplements, not just new ingredients, and it expands the working definition of ‘chemically altered’ to include many changes that were not foreseen in the Congressional Record in 1994,” wrote the commentary’s co-authors Steve Mister, president and CEO of CRN, and John Hathcock, SVP international and regulatory affairs for CRN. “Through these misinterpretations, [the] FDA attempts to impose a food additives-like safety standard and gain de facto pre-market approval against the overt wishes of Congress.”

According to the CRN, the FDA includes the following provisions in its NDI Draft Guidance that effectively would impose a pre-market approval restriction:

  • Recharacterizing many existing dietary ingredients as new dietary ingredients by expanding the definition of “chemically altered” to classify innovations in manufacturing as being chemical alterations;

  • Requiring physical proof with “material evidence” that an ingredient actually was available in the market before 1994, and thus exempt from the NDI requirements;

  • Prohibiting bio-identical synthetic versions of botanical compounds from being classified as dietary ingredients at all;

  • Requiring a separate notification for each new product, as opposed to just the dietary ingredient; and

  • Declaring The Redbook, the official textbook for evaluating food additives, which has a “significantly higher threshold” for safety than the “reasonable expectation of safety” established under DSHEA, as “authoritative for demonstrating the safety of NDIs.”

“It is time for [the] FDA to reconsider its efforts to redistribute the safety burdens allocated by Congress in DSHEA, and to recognize that the pre-market paradigm of food additives is not what Congress intended for dietary supplements,” CRN concluded.


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