HEALTH

Kmart Pharmacy supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month with Rx transfer program

BY Allison Cerra

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. — Kmart Pharmacy is introducing an incentive program by which customers will be rewarded for transferring their prescriptions to a Kmart Pharmacy, and the retailer also will support The Breast Cancer Research Foundation.

 

The Transfer for a Cause program, which will run through Oct. 31, encourages customers to consolidate their prescriptions. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, more than 31% of Americans use two or more prescription drugs, which is a 5% increase over the last 10 years. With each qualifying prescription transferred:

  • Kmart Pharmacy customers will receive up to a $20 Kmart gift card. Customers may be eligible to receive up to $100 in Kmart gift cards by transferring their qualifying prescriptions (up to five transferred prescriptions per household) to Kmart Pharmacy; and
  • Kmart will donate $5 to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation — dedicated to preventing breast cancer and finding a cure for the disease — from every eligible prescription transferred to Kmart Pharmacy (up to five transferred prescriptions per household) between now and Oct. 31, with a minimum donation of $10,000.

 

 

"In addition to helping raise funds for The Breast Cancer Research Foundation, consolidating prescriptions is a simple step customers can take that will help give them even more control of their health," said Robb Ayshford, divisional VP pharmacy administration for Kmart. "Recognizing that the number of customers who have multiple prescriptions is increasing, it’s even more important for them to maintain all of them at one pharmacy. At Kmart, our knowledgeable pharmacists will review all prescriptions to help reduce the chance of a drug interaction."

 

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Industry voices concern over Matrixx Initiatives AER case

BY DSN STAFF

WASHINGTON —The pharmaceutical industry earlier this month weighed in on the case “Matrixx Initiatives vs. James Siracusano and NECA-IBEW Pension Fund.”

Both the Consumer Healthcare Products Association and the Council for Responsible Nutrition, and separately the Natural Products Association, filed supporting briefs to the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that the mere nondisclosure of adverse event reports to shareholders should not give rise to liability under federal securities laws without applying a statistical significance standard. The Supreme Court had agreed to place the case on its docket in June.

“The statistical significance standard recognized by most courts of appeals appropriately recognizes that adverse event reports, standing alone, are not ‘material’ for purposes of federal securities laws,” CHPA and CRN wrote in its amicus curiae. “The statistical significance standard addresses the quality of the evidence of a relationship between an adverse event and a product, and therefore it is not the kind of ‘bright-line’ rule that [the Supreme] Court rejected in Basic Inc. vs. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988).”

“The practical consequence of the Ninth Circuit’s decision, if it is not reversed, is that manufacturers…very likely will be forced to disclose all AERs, however insignificant, in order to avoid meritless—but expensive—strike suits against the supplement industry,” said Jonathan Cohn, who authored the NPA’s separate amicus curiae.

“Companies cannot possibly guess in advance what will be deemed adequate disclosure years later in collateral litigation,” said Scott Bass, a partner at Sidley Austin, which is counsel for the NPA. “The [Dietary Supplement and Nonprescription Drug Consumer Protection Act] explicitly states that AERs are not proof of causation.”

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Q&A: A dose of generic Meda-cine

BY Alaric DeArment

Many generic drug companies have long marketed branded drugs on the side, but lately, some branded drug companies have sought to enter the generics business as well. One of those companies is Meda Pharmaceuticals, the U.S. subsidiary of Swedish drug maker Meda AB. Drug Store News recently interviewed John White, Meda’s senior director of marketing.

Drug Store News: What gave Meda the idea of pursuing generics?

John White: Generic medications account for roughly 3-in-4 prescriptions dispensed across the United States. Meda has made the strategic decision to serve this large and growing segment of the market by forming Wallace Pharmaceuticals, a wholly owned subsidiary of Meda Pharmaceuticals. The strategy demonstrates Meda’s efforts to diversify, align and better serve the needs and interests of our customers. We believe our ability to provide consistency in therapeutic effect, manufacturing and supply to our parent company’s branded products will prove to be a competitive advantage for Wallace Pharmaceuticals.

DSN: Considering that the available pool of blockbuster drugs coming off patent is getting smaller, how does Meda plan to use generics to drive growth for the company overall?

White: There is a significant opportunity for continued growth of generic prescription products in healthcare reform, and Wallace is well-positioned to become a preferred supplier of high-quality, high-value generic medicines. Wallace Pharmaceuticals creates an additional platform for Meda’s portfolio growth across therapeutic categories in which we will seek to introduce products where current and future market needs exist.

DSN: On what therapeutic areas do you plan to focus?

White: Wallace is launching with a core portfolio of Meda’s well-known allergy and pain medicines, and will be announcing additional product introductions in the upcoming months.

DSN: In what markets do you plan to concentrate business?

White: Efforts to launch Wallace Pharmaceuticals will be focused in the United States.

DSN: What about biosimilars?

White: We have no plans at this time.

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