News

Kline: OTC market up 3% on returning brands and dietary supplement growth

BY Michael Johnsen

PARSIPPANY, N.J. — Sales of the U.S. OTC market in 2013 were up 3% to $23.5 billion at the manufacturer’s level, according to a blog on research firm Kline’s site posted Monday. 

"Driven by strong sales gains in analgesics, upper respiratory, nutritional and topical products, the market appears to be showing signs of recovery," wrote Laura Mahecha, Kline industry manager healthcare. "This is partly due to the long-awaited rejuvenation of several brands that have posted steep declines in the recent past as a result of supply disruptions and recalls. Brands such as Novartis’ Excedrin and Johnson & Johnson’s Tylenol and Motrin IB have experienced strong gains in 2013 thereby helping the analgesics category to post very strong gains this past year while Pfizer’s Advil, Bayer’s Aleve and private-label analgesics also posted gains in 2013."

Within nutrition, adult multivitamins, glucosamine and chondroitin and fish oils were significant market drivers, Mahecha reported. 

Looking ahead, Kline expects the OTC market to continue to expand as a result of new and innovative Rx-to-OTC switches. "With the addition of new Rx-to-OTC switch brands and, in some cases, entirely new OTC categories, the market is expected to gain considerable sales and growth in the next few years," Mahecha suggested.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

FDA approves Eliquis for DVT prophylaxis

BY Ryan Chavis

PRINCETON, N.J. and NEW YORK — Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Pfizer announced that the Food and Drug Administration approved a supplemental new drug application for Eliquis (apixaban). The drug is a preventive treatment for deep vein thrombosis, which can lead to pulmonary embolism for patients who have had hip or knee replacement surgery.  

“As the number of hip and knee replacement surgeries performed in the United States continues to increase, the risk of DVT following these surgeries remains a concern for physicians,” said Steven J. Romano, M.D., SVP and medicines development group head, Global Innovative Pharmaceuticals Business, Pfizer. “Eliquis provides patients and physicians with a new treatment option that offers twice daily oral dosing and no routine coagulation testing, and is broadly accessible through hospitals and managed healthcare formularies.”

An estimated 719,000 total knee replacement surgeries and 332,00 hip replacement surgeries are performed, the company said.

“DVT, which may lead to PE, is a serious medical condition,” said Richard J. Friedman, M.D., FRCSC, professor of orthopaedic surgery, Medical University of South Carolina. “The FDA approval of Eliquis gives U.S. orthopedic surgeons a new option for DVT prophylaxis in both hip and knee replacement surgery.”

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

News

Study: Google Flu Trend faulty

BY Michael Johnsen

HOUSTON — As part of research funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, a recent study found that Google Flu Trend may not be all it’s cracked up to be. The study, published in the journal Science, also suggested that aggregated big data tools may have their faults.

"Google Flu Trend is an amazing piece of engineering and a very useful tool, but it also illustrates where ‘big data’ analysis can go wrong," said Ryan Kennedy, University of Houston political science professor. He and co-researchers David Lazer (Northeastern University/Harvard University), Alex Vespignani (Northeastern University) and Gary King (Harvard University) detailed new research about the problematic use of big data from such aggregators as Google.

Even with modifications to the GFT over many years, the tool that set out to improve response to flu outbreaks has overestimated peak flu cases in the United States over the past two years, the researchers noted. 

"Many sources of ‘big data’ come from private companies, who, just like Google, are constantly changing their service in accordance with their business model," Kennedy said. "We need a better understanding of how this affects the data they produce; otherwise we run the risk of drawing incorrect conclusions and adopting improper policies."

GFT overestimated the prevalence of flu in the 2012-2013 season, as well as the actual levels of flu in 2011-2012, by more than 50%, according to the research. Additionally, from August 2011 to September 2013, GFT over-predicted the prevalence of flu in 100 out of 108 weeks.

The team also questioned data collections from such platforms as Twitter and Facebook (like polling trends and market popularity), as campaigns and companies can manipulate these platforms to ensure their products are trending.

Still, the article contends there is room for data from the Googles and Twitters of the Internet to combine with more traditional methodologies, in the name of creating a deeper and more accurate understanding of human behavior.

"Our analysis of Google Flu demonstrates that the best results come from combining information and techniques from both sources," Kennedy said. "Instead of talking about a ‘big data revolution,’ we should be discussing an ‘all data revolution,’ where new technologies and techniques allow us to do more and better analysis of all kinds." 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES