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KIND adds three bars to its product lineup

BY Brian Berk

NEW YORK — KIND bars and snacks added Cinnamon Oat and Double Dark Chocolate to its Healthy Grains bar portfolio and Pressed by KIND Strawberry Apple Chia to its Pressed by KIND family. The Cinnamon Oat and Double Dark Chocolate bars contain 5 grams of sugar with more than one full serving of 100% whole grains. These bars also contain a five super-grain blend of oats, millet, quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat. They are also gluten-free and contain no artificial sweeteners.

Pressed by KIND Strawberry Apple Chia has no added sugar, contains two full servings of fruit and is vegan, dairy-free, and gluten-free. 

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Mountain Dew launches new global campaign

BY Brian Berk

PURCHASE, N.Y. — Mountain Dew introduced its new global “Do the Dew” campaign, centered around the belief that “there’s no feeling like doing.”

The campaign is set to appear in 20 countries throughout the world, kicking off Monday with the first piece in its series, “Fade Away,” which premiered on social media and television.

"The Dew Nation is into a wide array of activities from action sports to gaming," said Greg Lyons, SVP marketing, Mountain Dew, North America. "Besides their love of Mountain Dew, what truly unites them is the idea of chasing a feeling. A feeling you only get from doing something exhilarating. Whether it's the thrill you get when you land a kickflip or the rush from completing a set on stage, this campaign is a celebration of the feeling of doing." 

The U.S. advertising campaign is heavily optimized for social media, including ads that were designed within the mobile environment.

The global campaign is directed by music and commercial director Andreas Nilsson, and features athletes in action as they chase the euphoric feeling of “doing.”

Mountain Dew is a PepsiCo product.

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Coca-Cola sued for allegedly ‘deceiving consumers’ about sugar-sweetened beverages

BY Brian Berk

ATLANTA — A lawsuit filed on behalf of the nonprofit profit group Praxis Project in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California claims Coca-Cola and trade organization the American Beverage Association are “deceiving consumers about the harms of consuming Coke and other sugar-sweetened beverages.”

The suit alleges Coca-Cola and the ABA are engaged in an unlawful campaign of deception to mislead and confuse the public about the science linking the consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks to obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The 40-page complaint further alleges the Coca-Cola-ABA campaign led consumers to believe all calories are the same, when science indicates sugar drinks play a “distinct role” in the obesity epidemic.

Coca-Cola issued a statement vehemently opposing the claims put forth in the lawsuit.

“This lawsuit is legally and factually meritless,” Coca-Cola stated on its website. “We take our consumers and their health very seriously and have been on a journey to become a more credible and helpful partner in helping consumers manage their sugar consumption. To that end, we have led the industry adopting clear, front-of-pack calorie labeling for all our beverages.  We are innovating to expand low- and no-calorie products; offering and promoting more drinks in smaller sizes; reformulating products to reduce added sugars; transparently disclosing our funding of health and well-being scientific research and partnerships; and do not advertise to children under 12. We will continue to listen and learn from the public health community and remain committed to playing a meaningful role in the fight against obesity.”

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