HEALTH

Kaz supports cough-cold-flu continuing education

BY DSN STAFF

NEW YORK — Cough, cold and flu are among the most commonly experienced conditions in adults and children, leading them to seek medical care.

In an effort to support healthcare provider education around these topics, Kaz has sponsored CE lessons for pharmacists, technicians, and nurse practitioners.

To access the lesson, pharmacists can click here; pharmacy technicians can click here; and nurse practitioners can click here.

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Amway taps Kara Goucher for Nutrilite

BY Allison Cerra

ADA, Mich. — Amway’s line of vitamin, mineral and dietary supplements has tapped a world-class distance runner to be its new spokeswoman.

Kara Goucher will represent the Nutrilite brand at the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon series, in which Nutrilite is a sponsor. Goucher will represent the brand at several of these races by speaking at race events and appearing at the Nutrilite mobile brand experience during race weekend. Her name and likeness also will appear online and in print in various Nutrilite marketing efforts, the company said.

“Kara Goucher is an excellent fit for the optimal health philosophy of the Nutrilite brand,” said Jori Hartwig, VP marketing for Amway North America. “People actively pursuing a healthy lifestyle — whether they’re elite athletes or weekend warriors — can relate to and be inspired by her commitment to her sport and to her family’s well-being.”

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N.Y. politician looks to make medicine cups, dosage devices safer for children

BY Michael Johnsen

HUNTINGTON, N.Y. — Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., plans to introduce new legislation soon to make medicine cups and other dosage devices commonly used to give medicine to children safer, the Congress leader recently announced. However, the need for such a bill may be moot as the over-the-counter industry already is actively initiating guidelines to standardize dosing directions and units of measuring that dose.

“When we give our kids medicine, we hope we’re making them better,” Israel stated in a pre-Christmas announcement. “But when nearly all the medicine cups and dosing devices used with our kids’ medicine are flawed, there is a chance we could be making them worse. Why would a medicine’s label say tablespoons when the dosing cup is in teaspoons? We’ve been too lax about these flaws for too long.”

Israel cited a study published in the December 2010 Journal of the American Medical Association, which found that 99% of medicine cups and dosage devices were flawed, as the impetus behind the bill.

However, the industry actively has been addressing this issue, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association announced in late November when the AMA journal hit the newsstands. “The [over-the-counter] medicine industry takes very seriously its responsibility to help parents and caregivers safely and correctly administer OTC pediatric oral medicines to children,” the association stated. “Accordingly, the nation’s OTC medicine makers are working in partnership with other stakeholders and more than a year ago approved voluntary guidelines regarding dosing devices and volumetric measurements.”

The industry has approved voluntary guidelines, including the uniform use of tables to communicate dosing guidelines, as opposed to only text, and the use of milliliters as the preferred unit for dosing with an abbreviation to read “mL.” “It is our goal that all OTC medicines will fully follow the guidelines by the end of 2011,” CHPA stated.

“When we give our kids medicine, we hope we’re making them better,” Israel stated in a pre-Christmas announcement. “But when nearly all the medicine cups and dosing devices used with our kids’ medicine are flawed, there is a chance we could be making them worse. Why would a medicine’s label say tablespoons when the dosing cup is in teaspoons? We’ve been too lax about these flaws for too long.”

Israel cited a study published in the December 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, which found that 99% of medicine cups and dosage devices were flawed, as the impetus behind the bill.

However, the industry actively has been addressing this issue, the Consumer Healthcare Products Association announced in late November, when the AMA journal hit the newsstands. “The [OTC] medicine industry takes very seriously its responsibility to help parents and caregivers safely and correctly administer OTC pediatric oral medicines to children,” the association stated. “Accordingly, the nation’s OTC medicine makers are working in partnership with other stakeholders and, more than a year ago, approved voluntary guidelines regarding dosing devices and volumetric measurements.”

The industry has approved voluntary guidelines, including the uniform use of tables to communicate dosing guidelines as opposed to only text, and the use of milliliters as the preferred unit for dosing with an abbreviation to read mL. “It is our goal that all OTC medicines will fully follow the guidelines by the end of 2011,” the CHPA stated.

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